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Business Training in Tanzania: From Research-driven Experiment to Local Implementation-super- †

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  • Lars Ivar Oppedal Berge
  • Kjetil Bjorvatn
  • Kartika Sari Juniwaty
  • Bertil Tungodden

Abstract

Field experiments documenting positive treatment effects have a strong policy message: scale up! However, such experiments are typically implemented under close supervision of the research group in charge of the study. In contrast, scaling up would typically imply relying on local organisation. It is not obvious that the positive treatment effects identified in the research-driven intervention can be replicated locally. The present study explicitly addresses this challenge by analysing the local version of a research-driven business training programme among microfinance entrepreneurs in Tanzania. Comparing the local programme with the research-led programme in terms of attendance and subjective evaluation, we find that success in local implementation cannot be taken for granted. Moreover, an analysis of long-term outcomes also demonstrates a weaker impact of the local programme. We conclude that the estimated effect of research-led interventions should be interpreted as an upper bound of what can be achieved when scaling up such interventions locally. Copyright 2012 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Ivar Oppedal Berge & Kjetil Bjorvatn & Kartika Sari Juniwaty & Bertil Tungodden, 2012. "Business Training in Tanzania: From Research-driven Experiment to Local Implementation-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(5), pages -827, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:21:y:2012:i:5:p:-827
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejs016
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Drexler & Greg Fischer & Antoinette Schoar, 2014. "Keeping It Simple: Financial Literacy and Rules of Thumb," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 1-31, April.
    2. Sseruyange, J. & Bulte, E., 2018. "Do Incentives matter for Knowledge Diffusion? Experimental Evidence from Uganda," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275896, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Meier zu Selhausen, Felix, 2016. "Women's empowerment in Uganda: colonial roots and contemporary efforts, 1894-2012," Economics PhD Theses 0715, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    4. Bjorvatn, Kjetil & Cappelen, Alexander W. & Sekei, Linda Helgesson & Sørensen, Erik Ø. & Tungodden, Bertil, 2015. "Teaching through television: Experimental evidence on entrepreneurship education in Tanzania," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 3/2015, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    5. Lars Ivar Oppedal Berge & Kjetil Bjorvatn & Bertil Tungodden, 2015. "Human and Financial Capital for Microenterprise Development: Evidence from a Field and Lab Experiment," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 61(4), pages 707-722, April.
    6. Cameron, Lisa A. & Shah, Manisha, 2017. "Scaling Up Sanitation: Evidence from an RCT in Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 10619, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Mano, Yukichi & Akoten, John & Yoshino, Yutaka & Sonobe, Tetsushi, 2014. "Teaching KAIZEN to small business owners: An experiment in a metalworking cluster in Nairobi," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 25-42.
    8. Go Shimada & Tetsushi Sonobe, 2018. "Impacts of Kaizen Management on Workers: Evidence from Central America and the Caribbean Region," Working Papers 173, JICA Research Institute.

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