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Measuring Gender Differences in Information Sharing Using Network Analysis: the Case of the Austrian Interlocking Directorship Network in 2009

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  • Drago, Carlo
  • Amidani Aliberti, Livia
  • Carbonai, Davide

Abstract

In recent literature a relevant problem has been the relationship between career/personal contact networks and different career paths. In addition, the recent advances in social capital theory have shown the way in which networks impact on personal careers. In particular women’s careers appear to be negatively affected by the informational network structure. The main contribution of this work is to propose empirical evidence of this phenomenon by considering the gendered directorship network with relation to Austria and to show the structural differences by gender in the network. By using community detection techniques we have found various communities in which females seem not to be present at all, where females show significantly fewer contacts than males in the network, and finally where the proportion of males exceeds 91%. The results show the predominant role in the network of male directors; these differences are very relevant if we consider the network as a tool of vehicle information and as a power mechanism. In this paper we wish to make an original contribution to the debate of the well-known “glass-ceiling” effect

Suggested Citation

  • Drago, Carlo & Amidani Aliberti, Livia & Carbonai, Davide, 2014. "Measuring Gender Differences in Information Sharing Using Network Analysis: the Case of the Austrian Interlocking Directorship Network in 2009," Climate Change and Sustainable Development 178241, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:feemcl:178241
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.178241
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/178241/files/NDL2014-061.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Singh, Val & Terjesen, Siri & Vinnicombe, Susan, 2008. "Newly appointed directors in the boardroom:: How do women and men differ," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 48-58, February.
    2. Stephen P. Borgatti & Rob Cross, 2003. "A Relational View of Information Seeking and Learning in Social Networks," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 432-445, April.
    3. Leo Mac Canna & Niamh Brennan & Eleanor O'Higgins, 1998. "National Networks of Corporate Power: An Irish Perspective," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 2(4), pages 357-379, December.
    4. Santella, Paolo & Drago, Carlo & Polo, Andrea & Gagliardi, Enrico, 2009. "A Comparison among the director networks in the main listed companies in France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom," MPRA Paper 16397, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Santella, Paolo & Drago, Carlo & Polo, Andrea, 2007. "The Italian Chamber of Lords Sits on Listed Company Boards: An Empirical Analysis of Italian Listed Company Boards from 1998 to 2006," MPRA Paper 2265, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Carlos Drago & Francesco Millo & Roberto Ricciuti & Paolo Santella, 2011. "Corporate Governance Reforms, Interlocking Directorship Networks and Company Value in Italy (1998-2007)," CESifo Working Paper Series 3322, CESifo.
    7. Traud, Amanda L. & Mucha, Peter J. & Porter, Mason A., 2012. "Social structure of Facebook networks," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(16), pages 4165-4180.
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    Keywords

    Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

    JEL classification:

    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • M5 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics
    • C60 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - General
    • C4 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics

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