IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/eaae11/114312.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Hail Insurance and Pesticide use in French agriculture: an empirical analysis of multiple risks management

Author

Listed:
  • Chakir, Raja
  • Hardelin, Julien

Abstract

This paper investigates the determinants of rapeseed hail insurance and pesticide use decisions using individual panel data set of French farms covering the period from 1993 to 2004. Economic theory suggests that insurance and prevention decisions are not independent due to risk reduction and/or moral hazard effects. Statistical tests show that the pesticide use and hail insurance demand are endogenous to each other. An econometric model involving two simultaneous equations with a mixed censored/continuous dependent variables is then estimated. Estimation results show that rapeseed insurance demand has a positive and significant effect on pesticide use and vice versa. Insurance demand is also positively influenced by the yield’s coefficient of variation and the loss ratio, and negatively influenced by proxies for wealth (including CAP subsidies) and activity diversification.

Suggested Citation

  • Chakir, Raja & Hardelin, Julien, 2011. "Hail Insurance and Pesticide use in French agriculture: an empirical analysis of multiple risks management," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114312, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae11:114312
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/114312
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rulon D. Pope, 2003. "Agricultural Risk Analysis: Adequacy of Models, Data, and Issues," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1249-1256.
    2. Richard E. Just & Linda Calvin & John Quiggin, 1999. "Adverse Selection in Crop Insurance: Actuarial and Asymmetric Information Incentives," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 834-849.
    3. Barry K. Goodwin & Monte L. Vandeveer & John L. Deal, 2004. "An Empirical Analysis of Acreage Effects of Participation in the Federal Crop Insurance Program," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(4), pages 1058-1077.
    4. Just, Richard E., 2000. "Some Guiding Principles for Empirical Production Research in Agriculture," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(02), pages 138-158, October.
    5. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1974. "Multivariate Regression and Simultaneous Equation Models when the Dependent Variables Are Truncated Normal," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(6), pages 999-1012, November.
    6. Phoebe Koundouri & Marita Laukkanen & Sami Myyrä & Céline Nauges, 2009. "The effects of EU agricultural policy changes on farmers' risk attitudes," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 36(1), pages 53-77, March.
    7. Robert Innes, 1990. "Government Target Price Intervention in Economies with Incomplete Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(4), pages 1035-1052.
    8. JunJie Wu, 1999. "Crop Insurance, Acreage Decisions, and Nonpoint-Source Pollution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(2), pages 305-320.
    9. Chavas, Jean-Paul & Holt, Matthew T, 1996. "Economic Behavior under Uncertainty: A Joint Analysis of Risk Preferences and Technology," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 329-335, May.
    10. Kirwan, Barrett E., 2009. "Adversity and the Propensity to Fail: The Impact of Disaster Payments and Multiple Peril Crop Insurance on U.S. Farm Exit Rates," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49569, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Vincent H. Smith & Alan E. Baquet, 1996. "The Demand for Multiple Peril Crop Insurance: Evidence from Montana Wheat Farms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 189-201.
    12. William Greene, 2004. "Fixed Effects and Bias Due to the Incidental Parameters Problem in the Tobit Model," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 125-147.
    13. Erik J. O'Donoghue & Michael J. Roberts & Nigel Key, 2009. "Did the Federal Crop Insurance Reform Act Alter Farm Enterprise Diversification?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 80-104.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Robert Finger & Niklaus Lehmann, 2012. "The influence of direct payments on farmers’ hail insurance decisions," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 343-354, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Risk and Uncertainty;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaae11:114312. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.