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Is Yield Endogenous to Price? An Empirical Evaluation of Inter- and Intra-Seasonal Corn Yield Response

Author

Listed:
  • Goodwin, Barry K.
  • Marra, Michele C.
  • Piggott, Nicholas E.
  • Mueller, Steffen

Abstract

An extensive empirical literature has examined the behavior of crop yields over time. Corn yields have been characterized by signficant increases reflecting an array of technological developments that have substantially boosted productivity. While much of the focus has been on modeling deterministic and possibly stochastic trends in yields over time, an equally important question involves the extent to which yield changes may occur in response to price. This paper addresses two dimensions of this issue. We first look at the extent to which realized yields (i.e., at harvest) tend to be influenced by planting{time quotes of post{harvest futures contracts. Second, we examine the potential for intra{seasonal responsiveness of yields to significant price swings. The latter response is especially important in light of recent arguments that weather offers identification through instruments that are completely exogenous to market conditions; a view often expressed in terms of a "natural experiment." We challenge this argument by finding that the potential does exist for yields to be affected by significant price changes that occur early in the growing season.

Suggested Citation

  • Goodwin, Barry K. & Marra, Michele C. & Piggott, Nicholas E. & Mueller, Steffen, 2012. "Is Yield Endogenous to Price? An Empirical Evaluation of Inter- and Intra-Seasonal Corn Yield Response," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124884, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:124884
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/124884/files/Goodwin_Marra_Piggott_Mueller.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Choi, Jung-Sup & Helmberger, Peter G., 1993. "How Sensitive are Crop Yields to Price Changes and Farm Programs?," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(01), pages 237-244, July.
    2. Roman Keeney & Thomas W. Hertel, 2009. "The Indirect Land Use Impacts of United States Biofuel Policies: The Importance of Acreage, Yield, and Bilateral Trade Responses," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 895-909.
    3. Michael J. Roberts & Wolfram Schlenker, 2013. "Identifying Supply and Demand Elasticities of Agricultural Commodities: Implications for the US Ethanol Mandate," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(6), pages 2265-2295, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wyatt Thompson & Joe Dewbre & Patrick Westfhoff & Kateryna Schroeder & Simone Pieralli & Ignacio Perez Dominguez, 2017. "Introducing medium-and long-term productivity responses in Aglink-Cosimo," JRC Working Papers JRC105738, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Hyunseok Kim & GianCarlo Moschini, 2018. "The Dynamics of Supply: U.S. Corn and Soybeans in the Biofuel Era," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 18-wp579, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    3. Santeramo, Fabio Gaetano & Lamonaca, Emilia & Contò, Francesco & Stasi, Antonio & Nardone, Gianluca, 2017. "Drivers of grain price volatility: a cursory critical review," MPRA Paper 79427, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Fabio G., Santeramo & Emilia, Lamonaca, 2018. "On the Drivers of Global Grain Price Volatility : an empirical investigation," MPRA Paper 86795, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries;

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