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Do Healthier Diets Cost More?

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  • Ranney, Christine K.
  • McNamara, Paul E.

Abstract

Do healthier diets cost more? We estimate a hedonic regression model of the U.S. diet. Given food expenditures and information on dietary intake we infer the marginal cost of improved quality. Meeting the Pyramid recommendations implies decreased expenditures from two of the seven food groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Ranney, Christine K. & McNamara, Paul E., 2002. "Do Healthier Diets Cost More?," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19588, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea02:19588
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McNamara, Paul E. & Ranney, Christine K. & Kantor, Linda Scott & Krebs-Smith, Susan M., 1999. "The gap between food intakes and the Pyramid recommendations: measurement and food system ramifications," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2-3), pages 117-133, May.
    2. Ladd, George W & Zober, Martin, 1977. " Model of Consumer Reaction to Product Characteristics," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 89-101, Se.
    3. Shi, Hongqi & Price, David W., 1998. "Impacts Of Sociodemographic Variables On The Implicit Values Of Breakfast Cereal Characteristics," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 23(01), July.
    4. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    5. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
    6. Parke E. Wilde & Paul E. McNamara & Christine K. Ranney, 1999. "The Effect of Income and Food Programs on Dietary Quality: A Seemingly Unrelated Regression Analysis with Error Components," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 959-971.
    7. A. A. Prato & J. N. Bagali, 1976. "Nutrition and Nonnutrition Components of Demand for Food Items," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 58(3), pages 563-567.
    8. John E. Lenz & Ron C. Mittelhammer & Hongqi Shi, 1994. "Retail-Level Hedonics and the Valuation of Milk Components," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 76(3), pages 492-503.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vincenzo Atella & Joanna Kopinska, 2011. "Body weight of Italians: the weight of Education," CEIS Research Paper 189, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 23 Mar 2011.
    2. PAN, Jay & QIN, Xuezheng & LIU, Gordon G., 2013. "The impact of body size on urban employment: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 249-263.
    3. Drescher, Larissa & Thiele, Silke & Weiss, Christoph R., 2008. "The taste for variety: A hedonic analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 66-68, October.
    4. Muth, Mary K. & Zhen, Chen & Taylor, Justin & Cates, Sheryl & Kosa, Katherine M. & Zorn, David & Choiniere, Conrad J., 2009. "The Value to Consumers of Health Labeling Statements on Breakfast Foods and Cereals," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50333, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Smed, Sinne & Hansen, Lars Garn, 2010. "Consumer valuation of health attributes in food," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116390, European Association of Agricultural Economists;Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Vincenzo Atella & Joanna Kopinska, 2014. "Body Weight, Eating Patterns, and Physical Activity: The Role of Education," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(4), pages 1225-1249, August.
    7. Courtemanche, Charles & Carden, Art, 2011. "Supersizing supercenters? The impact of Walmart Supercenters on body mass index and obesity," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 165-181, March.
    8. Courtemanche, Charles & Carden, Art, 2009. "The skinny on big box retailing: Wal-Mart, warehouse clubs, and obesity," MPRA Paper 25326, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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