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Arbitrage and the Price of Oil


  • Vipin Arora



The model simulated in this paper shows that falling interest rates contribute to rising oil prices. This occurs because oil producers treat oil in the ground as an asset and attempt to arbitrage differences between its rate of return and the interest rate. When calibrated to match observed data over the last two decades, model results indicate that this arbitrage behaviour may have made the largest contribution to the pre-crisis boom in oil prices. Productivity driven growth shocks raise the oil price by about 70 percent, but this rises to 150 percent when falling interest rates are included.

Suggested Citation

  • Vipin Arora, 2011. "Arbitrage and the Price of Oil," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-535, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:acb:cbeeco:2011-535

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    Cited by:

    1. Rod Tyers, 2016. "China and Global Macroeconomic Interdependence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(11), pages 1674-1702, November.
    2. Rod Tyers, 2013. "A Simple Model to Study Global Macroeconomic Interdependence," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 13-23, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    3. Tyers, Rod, 2015. "International effects of China's rise and transition: Neoclassical and Keynesian perspectives," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-19.
    4. Prayudhi Azwar & Rod Tyers, 2015. "Indonesian Macro Policy through Two Crises," CAMA Working Papers 2015-16, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    5. Rod Tyers, 2014. "Pessimism Shocks in a Model of Global Macroeconomic Interdependence," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 14-28, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    6. Tyers, Rod, 2014. "Looking inward for transformative growth," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 166-184.
    7. Wan, Jer-Yuh & Kao, Chung-Wei, 2015. "Interactions between oil and financial markets — Do conditions of financial stress matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 160-175.
    8. Turuntseva, M. & Zyamalov, V., 2016. "Stock Markets under the Changing Terms of Trade," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 31(3), pages 93-109.
    9. Arora, Vipin & Tanner, Matthew, 2013. "Do oil prices respond to real interest rates?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 546-555.
    10. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang & Tsun Se Cheong, 2013. "China’s Saving and Global Economic Performance," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 13-20, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    11. Shakizada Niyazbekova & Igor Grekov & Tatiana Blokhina, 2016. "The Influence Of Macroeconomic Factors To The Dynamics Of Stock Exchange In The Republic Of Kazakhstan," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(4), pages 1263-1273.
    12. Vipin Arora, 2011. "Asset Value, Interest Rates and Oil Price Volatility," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(s1), pages 45-55, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • F47 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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