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Marriage Market Equilibrium, Qualifications, and Ability

Author

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  • Dan Anderberg

    (Royal Holloway, Institute for Fiscal Studies, and CESifo)

  • Jesper Bagger

    () (Royal Holloway and the Dale T. Mortensen Centre, Aarhus University)

  • V. Bhaskar

    (University of Texas at Austin and CEPR)

  • Tanya Wilson

    (University of Glasgow and IZA)

Abstract

We study marital sorting on academic qualifications and latent ability in an equilibrium marriage market model using the 1972 UK Raising of the School-Leaving Age (RoSLA) legislation as a natural experiment that induced a sudden, large shift in the distribution of academic qualifications in affected cohorts, but plausibly had no impact on the distribution of ability. We show that a Choo and Siow (2006) model with sorting on cohort, qualifications, and latent ability is identified and estimable using the RoSLA-induced population shifts. We find that the RoSLA isolated low ability individuals in the marriage market, and affected marital outcomes of individuals whose qualification attainment were unaffected. We also decompose the difference in marriage probabilities between unqualified individuals and those with basic qualifications into causal effects stemming from ability and qualification differences. Differences in marriage probabilities are almost entirely driven by ability

Suggested Citation

  • Dan Anderberg & Jesper Bagger & V. Bhaskar & Tanya Wilson, 2019. "Marriage Market Equilibrium, Qualifications, and Ability," Economics Working Papers 2019-03, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  • Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2019-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marriage; Qualifications; Assortative mating; Latent ability;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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