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Information Technology and the G7 Economies

In: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches

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  • Dale W. Jorgenson

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  • Dale W. Jorgenson, 2007. "Information Technology and the G7 Economies," NBER Chapters,in: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches, pages 325-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:0882
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McGrattan, Ellen R. & Schmitz, James Jr., 1999. "Explaining cross-country income differences," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 669-737 Elsevier.
    2. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2000. "The Resurgence of Growth in the Late 1990s: Is Information Technology the Story?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 3-22, Fall.
    3. Baldwin, John R. & Harchaoui, Tarek, 2002. "Productivity Growth in Canada," Productivity Growth in Canada, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division, number stcb6e, March.
    4. Jorgenson, Dale W. & Motohashi, Kazuyuki, 2005. "Information technology and the Japanese economy," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 460-481, December.
    5. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christophe Cahn & Arthur Saint-Guilhem, 2010. "Potential output growth in several industrialised countries a comparison," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 139-165, August.
    2. Jorgenson, Dale W., 2005. "Les technologies de l’information et les économies du G7," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 81(1), pages 15-45, Mars-Juin.
    3. Oulton, Nicholas & Srinivasan, Sylaja, 2005. "Productivity growth and the role of ICT in the United Kingdom: an industry view, 1970-2000," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19901, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Cette, Gilbert & Mairesse, Jacques & Kocoglu, Yusuf, 2005. "ICT diffusion and potential output growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 231-234, May.
    5. John R. Baldwin & Tarek M. Harchaoui, 2006. "The Integration of the Canadian Productivity Accounts within the System of National Accounts: Current Status and Challenges Ahead," NBER Chapters,in: A New Architecture for the U.S. National Accounts, pages 439-470 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Fernando Lera & Margarita Billón, 2004. "The North-South Digital Divide in Information and Communication Technologies Development: the Case for Spanish Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa04p307, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Pierre-Alexandre Noual, 2005. "Investment in ICTs: an empirical analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(5), pages 309-312.
    8. Nirvikar Singh, 2008. "Transaction costs, information technology and development," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(2), pages 212-236, September.
    9. Melka, Johanna & Nayman, Laurence, 2005. "L’impact des nouvelles technologies de l’information sur la croissance française, 1980-2001," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 81(1), pages 75-110, Mars-Juin.
    10. Jake Kendall & Nirvikar Singh, 2006. "Internet Kiosks in Rural India: What Influences Success?," Working Papers 06-05, NET Institute, revised Sep 2006.
    11. Liu, Ting-Kun & Chen, Jong-Rong & Huang, Cliff J. & Yang, Chih-Hai, 2014. "Revisiting the productivity paradox: A semiparametric smooth coefficient approach based on evidence from Taiwan," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 300-308.
    12. Kaiji Chen & Ayse Imrohoroglu & Selo Imrohoroglu, 2005. "Japanese Saving Rate," Macroeconomics 0502017, EconWPA.
    13. Luca Guerrieri & Dale Henderson, 2005. "Investment-Specific and Multifactor Productivity in Multi-Sector Open Economies:Data and Analysis," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 143, Society for Computational Economics.
    14. Jones, Siôn & Jones, Pau, 2006. "e-Communications: Investment and the Regulatory Framework," MPRA Paper 3568, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2005. "Productivity growth in UK industries, 1970-2000: structural change and the role of ICT," Bank of England working papers 259, Bank of England.
    16. Dirk Pilat & Paul Schreyer, 2004. "The OECD Productivity Database: An Overview," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 8, pages 59-65, Spring.
    17. Dirk Pilat, 2005. "Canada's Productivity Performance in International Perspective," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 10, pages 24-44, Spring.
    18. Zelenyuk, Valentin, 2005. "Testing the impact of ICT in developed countries during 1980-1995: distributional analysis in Solow’s growth accounting framework," MPRA Paper 28029, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2010.
    19. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2006. "Information Technology and the G7 Economies," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 97(5), pages 189-215.

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