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Les technologies de l’information et les économies du G7

  • Jorgenson, Dale W.

    (Harvard University)

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    In this paper I present new international comparisons of economic growth among the G7 nations – Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the U.K. and the U.S. These comparisons focus on the impact of investment in information technology (IT) equipment and software over the period 1980-2000. Using internationally harmonized prices, I have analyzed the role of investment and productivity as sources of growth in the G7 countries over the period 1980-2000. I have subdivided the period in 1989 and 1995 in order to focus on the most recent experience. I have decomposed growth of output for each country between growth of input and productivity. Finally, I have allocated the growth of input between investments in tangible assets, especially information technology and software, and human capital. Dans cet article, je compare la croissance économique des divers pays du G7 – le Canada, la France, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, le Japon, le Royaume-Uni et les États-Unis. Ces comparaisons s’articuleront autour des répercussions de l’investissement dans les technologies de l’information et les logiciels au cours de la période 1980-2001. En ayant recours aux prix internationaux harmonisés, j’ai analysé le rôle de l’investissement et de la productivité comme sources de la croissance dans les pays du G7 au cours de la période 1980-2001. J’ai subdivisé cette période de part et d’autre des années quatre-vingt-neuf et quatre-vingt-quinze, afin de pouvoir me concentrer davantage sur l’époque la plus récente. J’ai décomposé la croissance de la production de chaque pays en accroissement des intrants et en hausse de la productivité. Enfin, j’ai réparti l’augmentation des intrants entre les investissements dans les biens corporels, particulièrement dans le domaine des technologies de l’information et des logiciels, et dans le capital humain.

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    Article provided by Société Canadienne de Science Economique in its journal L'Actualité économique.

    Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 (Mars-Juin)
    Pages: 15-45

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    Handle: RePEc:ris:actuec:v:81:y:2005:i:1:p:15-45
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    1. Durlauf,S.N. & Quah,D.T., 1998. "The new empirics of economic growth," Working papers 3, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    2. Solow, Robert M., 2000. "Growth Theory: An Exposition," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780195109030, March.
    3. Dougherty, Chrys & Jorgenson, Dale W, 1996. "International Comparisons of the Sources of Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 25-29, May.
    4. McGrattan, Ellen R. & Schmitz, James Jr., 1999. "Explaining cross-country income differences," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 669-737 Elsevier.
    5. Mankiw, N Gregory & Romer, David & Weil, David N, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-37, May.
    6. Chamberlain, Gary, 1984. "Panel data," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 22, pages 1247-1318 Elsevier.
    7. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kazuyuki Motohashi, 2003. "Economic Growth of Japan and the United States in the Information Age," Discussion papers 03015, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2007. "Information Technology and the G7 Economies," NBER Chapters, in: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches, pages 325-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Nazrul Islam, 2003. "What have We Learnt from the Convergence Debate?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 309-362, 07.
    10. Paul M. Romer, 1987. "Crazy Explanations for the Productivity Slowdown," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1987, Volume 2, pages 163-210 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Dale Jorgenson & Eric Yip, 2001. "Whatever Happened to Productivity Growth?," NBER Chapters, in: New Developments in Productivity Analysis, pages 509-540 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Maddison, Angus, 1987. "Growth and Slowdown in Advanced Capitalist Economies: Techniques of Quantitative Assessment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 25(2), pages 649-98, June.
    13. Baldwin, John R. & Harchaoui, Tarek, 2002. "Productivity Growth in Canada," Productivity Growth in Canada, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis, number stcb6e, December.
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