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Emigration and wages in source countries: a survey of the empirical literature

In: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development

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  • Prachi Mishra

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the emerging empirical literature on the effect of emigration on wages in a source country. The evidence can be broadly divided into four categories: (i) case studies, (ii) simulation exercises, (iii) studies using regional variation and finally, (iv) national level studies. Overall, a substantial body of the evidence points towards a strong and positive relationship between emigration and source country wages. Importantly, the effect has been found to be statistically and economically significant. The estimates from the national-level studies across a wide range of countries range from two percent to five and a half percent increase in wages owing to a 10 percent emigrant supply shock. The impact of emigration on wages has important implications in source countries, for wage inequality across schooling groups and for national income distribution between labor and other factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Prachi Mishra, 2014. "Emigration and wages in source countries: a survey of the empirical literature," Chapters, in: Robert E.B. Lucas (ed.),International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 9, pages 241-266, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15465_9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Clemens, Michael & Pritchett, Lant, 2016. "The New Case for Migration Restrictions: An Assessment," Working Paper Series rwp16-054, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Gnangnon, Sèna Kimm, 2020. "Development Aid, Remittances Inflows and Wages in the Manufacturing Sector of Recipient-Countries," EconStor Preprints 213439, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    3. Vasily Astrov & Mario Holzner & Sebastian Leitner & Isilda Mara & Leon Podkaminer & Armon Rezai, 2018. "Die Lohnentwicklung in den mittel- und osteuropäischen Mitgliedsländern der EU," Working Paper Reihe der AK Wien - Materialien zu Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft 178, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik.
    4. Vasily Astrov & Mario Holzner & Sebastian Leitner & Isilda Mara & Leon Podkaminer & Armon Rezai, 2019. "Wage Developments in the Central and Eastern European EU Member States," wiiw Research Reports 443, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.

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