IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/elg/eechap/15105_8.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Urban policies

In: Urban Economics and Urban Policy

Author

Listed:
  • .

Abstract

In this bold, exciting and readable volume, Paul Cheshire, Max Nathan and Henry Overman illustrate the insights that recent economic research brings to our understanding of cities, and the lessons for urban policy-making. The authors present new evidence on the fundamental importance of cities to economic wellbeing and to the enrichment of our lives. They also argue that many policies have been trying to push water uphill and have done little to achieve their stated aims; or, worse, have had unintended and counterproductive consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • ., 2014. "Urban policies," Chapters,in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 8, pages 185-218 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15105_8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781781952511.00018.xml
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gabriel Ahlfeldt & Kristoffer Möller & Sevrin Waights & Nicolai Wendland, 2012. "On prisoner's dilemmas and gilded cages: The economics of heritage preservation," ERSA conference papers ersa12p783, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Stephen Gibbons & Teemu Lyytikäinen & Henry Overman & Rosa Sanchis-Guarner, 2012. "New Road Infrastructure: the Effects on Firms," SERC Discussion Papers 0117, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    3. Anne Bolster & Simon Burgess & Ron Johnston & Kelvyn Jones & Carol Propper & Rebecca Sarker, 2007. "Neighbourhoods, households and income dynamics: a semi-parametric investigation of neighbourhood effects," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 1-38, January.
    4. Philippe Aghion & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt & Susanne Prantl, 2009. "The Effects of Entry on Incumbent Innovation and Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(1), pages 20-32, February.
    5. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. & Moeller, Kristoffer & Waights, Sevrin & Wendland, Nicolai, 2013. "Game of zones: the economics of conservation areas," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58349, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Paul Lawless & Henry G. Overman & Peter Tyler, 2011. "Strategies for Underperforming Places," SERC Policy Papers 006, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    7. Dora L. Costa & Matthew E. Kahn, 2000. "Power Couples: Changes in the Locational Choice of the College Educated, 1940–1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1287-1315.
    8. Gilles Duranton, 2011. "California Dreamin': The Feeble Case for Cluster Policies," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 3(1), pages 3-45, July.
    9. Gibbons, Stephen & Overman, Henry G. & Resende, Guilherme, 2011. "Real earnings disparities in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33576, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Edward L. Glaeser, 2005. "The Curley Effect: The Economics of Shaping the Electorate," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-19, April.
    11. Ioannis Kaplanis, 2010. "Wage Effects from Changes in Local Human Capital in Britain," SERC Discussion Papers 0039, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    12. Hanson, Andrew & Rohlin, Shawn, 2013. "Do spatially targeted redevelopment programs spillover?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 86-100.
    13. Matias Busso & Jesse Gregory & Patrick Kline, 2013. "Assessing the Incidence and Efficiency of a Prominent Place Based Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(2), pages 897-947, April.
    14. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2003. "Deconstructing clusters: chaotic concept or policy panacea?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(1), pages 5-35, January.
    15. Stephen Gibbons & Henry G. Overman & Panu Pelkonen, 2014. "Area Disparities in Britain: Understanding the Contribution of People vs. Place Through Variance Decompositions," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(5), pages 745-763, October.
    16. Song, Yan & Knaap, Gerrit-Jan, 2003. "New urbanism and housing values: a disaggregate assessment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 218-238, September.
    17. Nathan, Max, 2007. "The Wrong Stuff? Creative Class Theory and Economic Performance in UK Cities," MPRA Paper 29486, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Twomey, Jim & Taylor, Jim, 1985. "Regional Policy and the Interregional Movement of Manufacturing Industry in Great Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 32(3), pages 257-277, November.
    19. repec:ehl:lserod:50482 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Richard Baldwin & Rikard Forslid & Philippe Martin & Gianmarco Ottaviano & Frederic Robert-Nicoud, 2005. "Economic Geography and Public Policy," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 7524.
    21. Michael Storper & Allen J. Scott, 2009. "Rethinking human capital, creativity and urban growth," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 147-167, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15105_8. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.