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The political economy of news media: theory, evidence and open issues

In: A Handbook of Alternative Theories of Public Economics

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  • Francesco Sobbrio

Abstract

This comprehensive and thought-provoking Handbook reviews public sector economics from pluralist perspectives that either complement or reach beyond mainstream views. The book takes a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach, drawing on economic elements in the fields of philosophy, sociology, psychology, history and law.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Sobbrio, 2014. "The political economy of news media: theory, evidence and open issues," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Alternative Theories of Public Economics, chapter 13, pages 278-320 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14898_13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Larbi Alaoui & Fabrizio Germano, 2012. "Time scarcity and the market for news," Economics Working Papers 1348, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Sep 2014.
    2. Durante, Ruben & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2015. "Attack When the World Is Not Watching? International Media and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict," CEPR Discussion Papers 10750, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro & Daniel F. Stone, 2014. "Media Bias in the Marketplace: Theory," NBER Working Papers 19880, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. May, Frank Christian & Münster, Johannes, 2013. "Centralized Bargaining in Press Wholesale," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79984, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Maria Battaggion & Alessandro Vaglio, 2015. "Watchdogs, Platforms and Audience: An Economic Perspective on Media Markets," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(2), pages 209-228, June.
    6. Marco Le Moglie & Gilberto Turati, 2018. "Electoral Cycle Bias in the Media Coverage of Corruption News," DISCE - Working Papers del Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza def069, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    7. Ivan Mauricio Duran, 2016. "Television and voting in Catalonia," Working Papers wpdea1603, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    8. Nicola Mastrorocco & Luigi Minale, 2016. "Information and Crime Perceptions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1601, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    9. Schroeder, Elizabeth & Stone, Daniel F., 2015. "Fox News and political knowledge," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 52-63.
    10. Raphael Bruce & Rafael Costa Lima, 2015. "Compulsory Voting and TV News Consumption," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2015_48, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP), revised 12 Jun 2017.
    11. Serena Marianna Drufuca, 2014. "Information, Media and Elections: Incentives for Media Capture," Working Papers (2013-) 1402, University of Bergamo, Department of Management, Economics and Quantitative Methods.

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