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Spillovers and Network Neutrality

In: Regulation and the Performance of Communication and Information Networks

Listed author(s):
  • Christiaan Hogendorn

Digital markets worldwide are in rapid flux. The Internet and World Wide Web have traditionally evolved in a largely deregulated environment, but recently governments have shown great interest in this rapidly developing sector and are imposing regulations for a variety of reasons that are changing the shape of these industries. This book explores why the industrial organization of broadband ISPs, Internet backbone providers and content/application providers are in such turmoil.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Gerald R. Faulhaber & Gary Madden & Jeffrey Petchey (ed.), 2012. "Regulation and the Performance of Communication and Information Networks," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14325.
  • This item is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Chapters with number 14325_8.
    Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14325_8
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