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Student Characteristics, Behavior, and Performance in Economics Classes

In: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics

Author

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  • Ann L. Owen

Abstract

The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics provides a comprehensive resource for instructors and researchers in economics, both new and experienced. This wide-ranging collection is designed to enhance student learning by helping economic educators learn more about course content, pedagogic techniques, and the scholarship of the teaching enterprise.

Suggested Citation

  • Ann L. Owen, 2011. "Student Characteristics, Behavior, and Performance in Economics Classes," Chapters, in: Gail M. Hoyt & KimMarie McGoldrick (ed.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 32, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13836_32
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    References listed on IDEAS

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