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Gender Differences in Research Patterns Among PhD Economists

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  • Debra A. Barbezat

Abstract

This study is based on a 1996 survey of PhD economists working in the academic and nonacademic sectors since 1989. Despite a raw gender difference in all types of research output, the male dummy variable proves statistically significant in predicting only one publication measure. In a full sample and faculty subsample, number of years since receipt of PhD, publication in a refereed journal as a graduate student, and the total number of presentations made in professional forums were consistently, positively related to research productivity. The importance of other independent variables varies by research output. Typically unavailable variables such as workload, time use, submissions data, and family circumstances are also examined.

Suggested Citation

  • Debra A. Barbezat, 2006. "Gender Differences in Research Patterns Among PhD Economists," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 359-375, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:37:y:2006:i:3:p:359-375 DOI: 10.3200/JECE.37.3.359-375
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. John P. Conley & Ali Sina Önder & Benno Torgler, 2012. "Are all High-Skilled Cohorts Created Equal? Unemployment, Gender, and Research Productivity," Working Papers 2012.86, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Ann L. Owen, 2011. "Student Characteristics, Behavior, and Performance in Economics Classes," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 32 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. John P. Conley & Ali Sina Önder & Benno Torgler, 2016. "Are all economics graduate cohorts created equal? Gender, job openings, and research productivity," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(2), pages 937-958, August.
    4. Araújo, Tanya & Fontainha, Elsa, 2017. "The specific shapes of gender imbalance in scientific authorships: A network approach," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 88-102.
    5. repec:spr:scient:v:111:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2327-9 is not listed on IDEAS

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