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Data Resources and Econometric Techniques

In: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics

Author

Listed:
  • William Bosshardt
  • Peter E. Kennedy

Abstract

The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics provides a comprehensive resource for instructors and researchers in economics, both new and experienced. This wide-ranging collection is designed to enhance student learning by helping economic educators learn more about course content, pedagogic techniques, and the scholarship of the teaching enterprise.

Suggested Citation

  • William Bosshardt & Peter E. Kennedy, 2011. "Data Resources and Econometric Techniques," Chapters, in: Gail M. Hoyt & KimMarie McGoldrick (ed.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 35, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13836_35
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848449688.00056.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769.
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    12. M. Ryan Haley & Marianne F. Johnson & M. Kevin McGee, 2010. "A Framework for Reconsidering the Lake Wobegon Effect," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 95-109, March.
    13. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    14. Christopher Clark & Benjamin Scafidi & John R. Swinton, 2011. "Do Peers Influence Achievement in High School Economics? Evidence from Georgia's Economics End of Course Test," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 3-18, January.
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