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Data Resources and Econometric Techniques

In: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics

Author

Listed:
  • William Bosshardt
  • Peter E. Kennedy

Abstract

The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics provides a comprehensive resource for instructors and researchers in economics, both new and experienced. This wide-ranging collection is designed to enhance student learning by helping economic educators learn more about course content, pedagogic techniques, and the scholarship of the teaching enterprise.

Suggested Citation

  • William Bosshardt & Peter E. Kennedy, 2011. "Data Resources and Econometric Techniques," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 35 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13836_35
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848449688.00056.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen T. Ziliak & Deirdre N. McCloskey, 2004. "Size Matters: The Standard Error of Regressions in the American Economic Review," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 1(2), pages 331-358, August.
    2. William Bosshardt, 2004. "Student Drops and Failure in Principles Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 111-128, April.
    3. Becker, William E & Walstad, William B, 1990. "Data Loss from Pretest to Posttest as a Sample Selection Problem," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(1), pages 184-188, February.
    4. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769.
    5. Becker, William E. & Powers, John R., 2001. "Student performance, attrition, and class size given missing student data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 377-388, August.
    6. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
    7. Kennedy, Peter E, 2002. " Sinning in the Basement: What Are the Rules? The Ten Commandments of Applied Econometrics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(4), pages 569-589, September.
    8. Martin Schlotter & Guido Schwerdt & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Econometric methods for causal evaluation of education policies and practices: a non-technical guide," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 109-137.
    9. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    10. Paul W. Grimes & Meghan J. Millea, 2011. "Economic Education in Post-Soviet Russia: The Effectiveness of the Training of Trainers Program," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 99-119, June.
    11. Jane S. Lopus & Paul W. Grimes & William E. Becker & Rodney A. Pearson, 2007. "Human Subjects Requirements and Economic Education Researchers," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 51(2), pages 49-60, October.
    12. Mary Ellen Benedict & John Hoag, 2004. "Seating Location in Large Lectures: Are Seating Preferences or Location Related to Course Performance?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 215-231, July.
    13. M. Ryan Haley & Marianne F. Johnson & M. Kevin McGee, 2010. "A Framework for Reconsidering the Lake Wobegon Effect," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 95-109, March.
    14. Christopher Clark & Benjamin Scafidi & John R. Swinton, 2011. "Do Peers Influence Achievement in High School Economics? Evidence from Georgia's Economics End of Course Test," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 3-18, January.
    15. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Class Attendance and Exam Performance: A Randomized Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 213-227, July.
    16. Maxwell, Nan L & Lopus, Jane S, 1994. "The Lake Wobegon Effect in Student Self-Reported Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 201-205, May.
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    Keywords

    Economics and Finance; Education;

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