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Efficiency in the Use of Technology in Economic Education: Some Preliminary Results

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  • Kim Sosin
  • Betty J. Lecha
  • Rajshree Agarwal
  • Robin L. Bartlett
  • Joseph I. Daniel

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Suggested Citation

  • Kim Sosin & Betty J. Lecha & Rajshree Agarwal & Robin L. Bartlett & Joseph I. Daniel, 2004. "Efficiency in the Use of Technology in Economic Education: Some Preliminary Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 253-258, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:94:y:2004:i:2:p:253-258
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/0002828041301623
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cardell, N Scott, et al, 1996. "Laboratory-Based Experimental and Demonstration Initiatives in Teaching Undergraduate Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 454-459, May.
    2. Becker, William E. & Powers, John R., 2001. "Student performance, attrition, and class size given missing student data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 377-388, August.
    3. Siegfried, John J & Fels, Rendigs, 1979. "Research on Teaching College Economics: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 923-969, September.
    4. Bartlett, Robin L & Feiner, Susan F, 1992. "Balancing the Economics Curriculum: Content, Method, and Pedagogy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 559-564, May.
    5. J J Arias & Douglas M. Walker, 2004. "Additional Evidence on the Relationship between Class Size and Student Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 311-329, October.
    6. Byron W. Brown & Carl E. Liedholm, 2002. "Can Web Courses Replace the Classroom in Principles of Microeconomics?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 444-448, May.
    7. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
    8. Mary O'Malley Borg & Harriet Stranahan, 2002. "The effect of gender and race on student performance in principles of economics: the importance of personality type," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 589-598.
    9. Rajshree Agarwal & A. Edward Day, 1998. "The Impact of the Internet on Economic Education," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 99-110, June.
    10. Maxwell, Nan L & Lopus, Jane S, 1994. "The Lake Wobegon Effect in Student Self-Reported Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 201-205, May.
    11. Becker, William E & Walstad, William B, 1990. "Data Loss from Pretest to Posttest as a Sample Selection Problem," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(1), pages 184-188, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. William Lee & Richard H. Courtney & Steven J. Balassi, 2010. "Do Online Homework Tools Improve Student Results in Principles of Microeconomics Courses?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 283-286, May.
    2. Phillip Saunders, 2011. "A history of economic education," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Christopher N. Annala & Shuo Chen & Daniel R. Strang, . "The Use of PRS in Introductory Microeconomics: Some Evidence on Performance and Attendance," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center.
    4. Adel Ben Youssef & Mounir Dahmani, 2008. "The Impact of ICT on Student Performance in Higher Education: Direct Effects, Indirect Effects and Organisational Change," Post-Print halshs-00936560, HAL.
    5. repec:kap:iaecre:v:21:y:2015:i:4:p:453-465 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ganesh, Gopala & Paswan, Audhesh K., 2010. "Teaching basic marketing accountability using spreadsheets: An exploratory perspective," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 182-190, February.
    7. Joshua D. Miller & Robert P. Rebelein, 2011. "Research on the Effectiveness of Non-Traditional Pedagogies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 30 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Turturean, Monica, 2012. "Current issues of motivation, academic performance and internet use- implications for an education of excellence," MPRA Paper 39250, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Rhodes, M. Taylor & Sarbaum, Jeffrey K., 2013. "Online Homework Management Systems: Should We Allow Multiple Attempts?," UNCG Economics Working Papers 13-14, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    10. Carlos Liard-Muriente & Christina Robinson, 2015. "The Write Experience in Economics: A Case Study from Central Connecticut State University," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 21(4), pages 453-465, November.
    11. Adel Ben Youssef & Ludovic Ragni, 2008. "Uses of Information and Communication Technologies in Europe's Higher Education Institutions: From Digital Divides to Digital Trajectories," Post-Print halshs-00937212, HAL.
    12. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2016. "microeconomics courses: Evidence from a regression discontinuity design experiment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 2094-2116.
    13. Daniel Lass & Bernard Morzuch & Richard Rogers, 2007. "Teaching with Technology to Engage Students and Enhance Learning," Working Papers 2007-1, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
    14. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Does Downloading PowerPoint Slides Before the Lecture Lead to Better Student Achievement?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 7(2), pages 9-18.
    15. Nicholas Flores & Scott J. Savage, 2007. "Student Demand for Streaming Lecture Video: Emprical Evidence from Undergraduate Economics Classes," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(2), pages 57-78.
    16. Haelermans, Carla & De Witte, Kristof, 2012. "The role of innovations in secondary school performance – Evidence from a conditional efficiency model," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 223(2), pages 541-549.
    17. Darragh Flannery & John Considine & Brendan Kennelly, 2013. "An Experiment with Online and Paper Assignments: Grades, Completion Rates and Student Preferences," Working Papers WP072013, University of Limerick, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2013.

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