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Student Demand for Streaming Lecture Video: Emprical Evidence from Undergraduate Economics Classes

Author

Listed:
  • Nicholas Flores

    () (University of Colorado at Boulder)

  • Scott J. Savage

    () (University of Colorado at Boulder)

Abstract

Real-time lectures recorded on video and streamed over the Internet are a useful supplement to non-classroom learning. However, because recording confines the instructor to the podium, the classroom experience is diminished when there is less social interaction. This study uses choice experiment data to estimate economics students' willingness to pay for streaming lecture video and instructor movement away from the podium. Results show a divide between students who like the flexibility of catching up on missed classes with video and students who do not. For this former group, video enhances the learning experience and students are willing to pay an additional $90 per course for video. An important source of streaming lecture video's value to students is its impact on performance. Knowledge equation estimates show a positive correlation between students' use of video and their cumulative final grade.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Flores & Scott J. Savage, 2007. "Student Demand for Streaming Lecture Video: Emprical Evidence from Undergraduate Economics Classes," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(2), pages 57-78.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:6:y:2007:i:2:p:57-78
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    File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/v6n2/flores.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2001. "Teaching Methods in U.S. Undergraduate Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 269-279, January.
    2. Kim Sosin & Betty J. Lecha & Rajshree Agarwal & Robin L. Bartlett & Joseph I. Daniel, 2004. "Efficiency in the Use of Technology in Economic Education: Some Preliminary Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 253-258, May.
    3. Grace Chan & Paul W. Miller & MoonJoong Tcha, 2005. "Happiness in University Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 4(1), pages 20-45.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2016. "microeconomics courses: Evidence from a regression discontinuity design experiment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 2094-2116.

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