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Do Supplemental Online Recorded Lectures Help Students Learn Microeconomics?

Author

Listed:
  • Jennjou Chen

    () (National Chengchi University)

  • Tsui-Fang Lin

    () (National Taipei University)

Abstract

This study sheds light on the relationship between the use of online recorded lectures and exam performance of students in the case of microeconomics. The study uses a rich panel data set covering Taiwanese students. Our results show that those who skip more classes and males are more likely to use online recorded lectures. As may be expected, most students access online recorded lectures just before exams, rather than immediately after lectures. Our fixed effects model shows a significant and positive relationship between students’ use of online recorded lectures and their grades.

Suggested Citation

  • Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2012. "Do Supplemental Online Recorded Lectures Help Students Learn Microeconomics?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(1), pages 6-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:11:y:2012:i:1:p:6-15
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    File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Ashley/Chen%20and%20Lin%20-%20Online%20Lectures.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Byron W. Brown & Carl E. Liedholm, 2002. "Can Web Courses Replace the Classroom in Principles of Microeconomics?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 444-448, May.
    2. Rajshree Agarwal & A. Edward Day, 1998. "The Impact of the Internet on Economic Education," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 99-110, June.
    3. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
    4. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Class Attendance and Exam Performance: A Randomized Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 213-227, July.
    5. Daniel R. Marburger, 2006. "Does Mandatory Attendance Improve Student Performance?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 148-155, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Olitsky, Neal H. & Cosgrove, Sarah B., 2016. "The better blend? Flipping the principles of microeconomics classroom," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 1-11.
    2. R. Inglesi-Lotz & Fritz Dresselhaus & J. Bohlmann, 2015. "Assessing the Impact of Just-in-Time Methodology, In-Lecture Activities, and Tutor-Assisted Post-Lecture Activities in the Course Experience of First Year Students in Economics at the University of Pr," Working Papers 201590, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2016. "microeconomics courses: Evidence from a regression discontinuity design experiment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 2094-2116.

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