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Experimentelle Evidenz zur Wirkung der Teilnahme an E-Learning-Veranstaltungen auf den Klausurerfolg


  • Decker, Philipp
  • Pierdzioch, Christian
  • Stadtmann, Georg


In diesem Beitrag wird analysiert, wie sich die Teilnahme an einer Lehrveranstaltung aus dem Bereich des E-Learning auf das Klausurergebnis auswirkt. Der Leistungsunterschied zwischen Teilnehmern und Nichtteilnehmern lasst sich nicht allein auf die Partizipation an der Veranstaltung zuruckfuhren, sondern gibt als Average Treatment Effect (ATE) die durchschnittliche Performance der Lehrveranstaltung hinsichtlich des studentischen Lernerfolgs an. Zur Kontrolle der Partizipationsneigung wurden die Teilnehmer im Rahmen eines Experiments in zwei Gruppen eingeteilt, denen teilweise unterschiedliche Lehrinhalte vermittelt wurden. Durch den Vergleich der beiden Teilnehmergruppen untereinander konnte der Average Effect of the Treatment on the Treated (ATT) ermittelt werden. Es zeigte sich, dass der Unterschied zwischen den Teilnehmern und den Verweigerern starker ausgeprägt ist, als zwischen den beiden Teilnehmergruppen des Experiments (ATE > ATT).

Suggested Citation

  • Decker, Philipp & Pierdzioch, Christian & Stadtmann, Georg, 2011. "Experimentelle Evidenz zur Wirkung der Teilnahme an E-Learning-Veranstaltungen auf den Klausurerfolg," Discussion Papers 306, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:euvwdp:306

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey A. Smith, 1995. "Assessing the Case for Social Experiments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 85-110, Spring.
    2. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
    3. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    4. Daniel R. Marburger, 2006. "Does Mandatory Attendance Improve Student Performance?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 148-155, April.
    5. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-346, May.
    6. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Class Attendance and Exam Performance: A Randomized Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 213-227, July.
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    More about this item


    Klausurerfolg; Veranstaltungsteilnahme; E-Learning;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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