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Happiness in University Education

Author

Listed:
  • Grace Chan

    (University of Western Australia)

  • Paul W. Miller

    () (University of Western Australia)

  • MoonJoong Tcha

    () (University of Western Australia)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to quantify the determinants of happiness in university students, with information drawn from a survey conducted with students at the University of Western Australia in 2003. An ordered probit model is applied. Happiness was linked to a range of factors, for instance, grades achieved, friendships developed, school facilities, opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities, and lecture quality. The findings reveal that the most important influences on the levels of satisfaction of students are school work, time management and relationships formed in university.

Suggested Citation

  • Grace Chan & Paul W. Miller & MoonJoong Tcha, 2005. "Happiness in University Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 4(1), pages 20-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:4:y:2005:i:1:p:20-45
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    File URL: https://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/i4/chan.htm
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2004. "Well-being over time in Britain and the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1359-1386, July.
    2. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
    3. Easterlin, Richard A, 2001. "Income and Happiness: Towards an Unified Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(473), pages 465-484, July.
    4. McFadden, Daniel L., 1984. "Econometric analysis of qualitative response models," Handbook of Econometrics,in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 24, pages 1395-1457 Elsevier.
    5. Frey, Bruno S & Stutzer, Alois, 2000. "Happiness, Economy and Institutions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(466), pages 918-938, October.
    6. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1157-1173, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Flores & Scott J. Savage, 2007. "Student Demand for Streaming Lecture Video: Emprical Evidence from Undergraduate Economics Classes," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(2), pages 57-78.
    2. Esa Mangeloja & Tatu Hirvonen, 2007. "What Makes University Students Happy?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(2), pages 27-41.
    3. Mohammad Alauddin & Clem Tisdell, 2007. "Factors That Affect Teaching Scores in Economics Instruction: Analysis of Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) Data," Discussion Papers Series 353, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    4. Andrew Howell & Karen Buro, 2015. "Measuring and Predicting Student Well-Being: Further Evidence in Support of the Flourishing Scale and the Scale of Positive and Negative Experiences," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 121(3), pages 903-915, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate

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