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The Effects of Remedial Mathematics on the Learning of Economics: Evidence from a Natural Experiment

  • Johan N. M. Lagerl�f
  • Andrew J. Seltzer

The authors examined the effects of remedial mathematics on performance in university-level economics courses using a natural experiment. They studied exam results prior and subsequent to the implementation of a remedial mathematics course that was compulsory for a subset of students and unavailable for the others, controlling for background variables. They found that, consistent with previous studies, the level of and performance in secondary school mathematics have strong predictive power on students' performances at university-level economics. However, they found relatively little evidence for a positive effect of remedial mathematics on student performance.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.3200/JECE.40.2.115-137
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of Economic Education.

Volume (Year): 40 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 115-137

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:40:y:2009:i:2:p:115-137
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  1. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2009. "Addressing the Needs of Underprepared Students in Higher Education: Does College Remediation Work?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(3).
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  4. Butler, J S & Finegan, T Aldrich & Siegfried, John J, 1994. "Does More Calculus Improve Student Learning in Intermediate Micro and Macro Economic Theory?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 206-10, May.
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  7. Eide, Eric & Showalter, Mark H., 1998. "The effect of school quality on student performance: A quantile regression approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 345-350, March.
  8. Juan José Dolado & E. Morales, 2007. "Which Factors Determine Academic Performance of Undergraduate Students in Economics?: Some Spanish Evidence," Working Papers 2007-23, FEDEA.
  9. Massimiliano BRATTI & Luca MANCINI, 2003. "Differences in Early Occupational Earnings of UK Male Graduates by Degree Subject: Evidence from the 1980-1993 USR," Working Papers 189, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  10. Charles L. Ballard & Marianne F. Johnson, 2004. "Basic Math Skills and Performance in an Introductory Economics Class," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 3-23, January.
  11. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-46, May.
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