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Success in Economics Major: Is it Path Dependent?

Author

Listed:
  • CARLOS J. ASARTA

    () (Department of Economics,University of Delaware)

  • ROGER B. BUTTERS

    () (Department of Economics,University of Nebraska)

  • ANDREW PERUMAL

    () (Department of Economics,University of Massachusetts)

Abstract

The economics profession has consistently demonstrated an interest in increasing the number of students exposed to economics, providing students with a quality education and identifying the key determinants of student success in the economics curriculum. Several strategies have been recommended and include implementing an applied approach rather than a theoretical approach (Okoye, 2011), exposing students to economics as early as possible in their undergraduate careers (Fournier and Sass, 2000), assigning popular professors to principles courses (Becker, 1997; Margo and Siegfried, 1996), modifying the curriculum to make economics more accessible to a broader range of students (Bartlett, 1995) or presenting material in a way that is relevant and interesting to students (Siegfried and Raymond, 1984).

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Andrew Perumal, 2013. "Success in Economics Major: Is it Path Dependent?," Working Papers 13-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:13-11.
    as

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    File URL: http://www.lerner.udel.edu/sites/default/files/ECON/PDFs/RePEc/dlw/WorkingPapers/2013/UDWP13-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Hirschel Kasper, 2005. "Peer to Peer: Right and Wrong Lessons for Department Reviews," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 185-197, April.
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    11. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters, 2012. "The Discouraged-Business-Major Hypothesis Revisited: Could Economics be the Encouraged-Business-Major?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(1), pages 19-32, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics Major; Undergraduate; Education; Assessment;

    JEL classification:

    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General
    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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