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Central bank balance sheets and foreign exchange rate regimes: understanding the nexus in Asia

In: Are central bank balance sheets in Asia too large?

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  • Andrew Filardo

    (Bank for International Settlements)

  • Stephen Grenville

    (Lowy Institute)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Filardo & Stephen Grenville, 2012. "Central bank balance sheets and foreign exchange rate regimes: understanding the nexus in Asia," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Are central bank balance sheets in Asia too large?, volume 66, pages 76-110 Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbpc:66-05
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    File URL: http://www.bis.org/publ/bppdf/bispap66e_rh.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 1065-1188, November.
    3. Joshua Aizenman & Menzie D. Chinn & Hiro Ito, 2008. "Assessing the Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Measuring the Trilemma's Configurations over Time," NBER Working Papers 14533, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Michael Hutchison & Rajeswari Sengupta & Nirvikar Singh, 2012. "India’s Trilemma: Financial Liberalisation, Exchange Rates and Monetary Policy," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(1), pages 3-18, January.
    5. Alice Ouyang & Ramkishen Rajan & Tom Willett, 2008. "Managing the Monetary Consequences of Reserve Accumulation in Emerging Asia," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 171-199.
    6. David Hauner, 2006. "A Fiscal Price Tag for International Reserves," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 169-195, August.
    7. Carlos Montoro & Ramon Moreno, 2011. "The use of reserve requirements as a policy instrument in Latin America," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    8. Dong He & Frank Leung & Philip Ng, 2009. "A Framework for Monitoring Capital Flows in Hong Kong," Working Papers 0916, Hong Kong Monetary Authority.
    9. M S Mohanty & Philip Turner, 2006. "Foreign exchange reserve accumulation in emerging markets: what are the domestic implications?," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    10. Paul Moser-Boehm, 2005. "Governance aspects of foreign exchange interventions," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Foreign exchange market intervention in emerging markets: motives, techniques and implications, volume 24, pages 19-39 Bank for International Settlements.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew J. Filardo & Pierre L. Siklos, 2016. "Prolonged Reserves Accumulation, Credit Booms, Asset Prices and Monetary Policy in Asia," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 364-381, February.
    2. Filardo, Andrew & Genberg, Hans & Hofmann, Boris, 2016. "Monetary analysis and the global financial cycle: An Asian central bank perspective," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-16.
    3. Chan-Guk Huh & Jie Wu, 2015. "Linkage between US monetary policy and emerging economies: the case of Korea?s financial market and monetary policy," International Journal of Economic Sciences, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, vol. 4(3), pages 1-18, September.
    4. Andrew Filardo, 2013. "Managing stop–go capital flows in Asian emerging markets: lessons for the CESEE economies," Chapters,in: A New Model for Balanced Growth and Convergence, chapter 5, pages 49-59 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Aaron Mehrotra, 2012. "On the use of sterilisation bonds in emerging Asia," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Are central bank balance sheets in Asia too large?, volume 66, pages 111-131 Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Chan-Guk Huh, 2015. "Normalization of unconventional US monetary policy and its implications: Korea?s monetary policy case," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 2504115, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    7. Al-Abri, Almukhtar & Baghestani, Hamid, 2015. "Foreign investment and real exchange rate volatility in emerging Asian countries," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 34-47.

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