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Central bank finances


  • Bank for International Settlements


This paper looks at the relevance of a central bank's own finances for its policy work. Some central banks are exposed to significant financial risks, partly due to the environment in which they operate, and partly due to the nature of policy actions. While financial exposures and losses do not hamper central banks' operational capabilities, they may weaken the effectiveness of central bank policy transmission. Against this backdrop, the paper analyses the determinants of a central bank's financial position and the possible implications of insufficient financial resources for policymaking. It also provides a conceptual framework for considering the question of whether central banks have sufficient financial resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Bank for International Settlements, 2013. "Central bank finances," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 71, february.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbps:71

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. christiaan Pattipeilohy, 2016. "A comparative analysis of developments in central bank balance sheet composition," BIS Working Papers 559, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Chan-Guk Huh & Jie Wu, 2015. "Linkage between US monetary policy and emerging economies: the case of Korea?s financial market and monetary policy," International Journal of Economic Sciences, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, vol. 4(3), pages 1-18, September.
    3. Bernard J Laurens & Kelly Eckhold & Darryl King & Nils Øyvind Mæhle & Abdul Naseer & Alain Durré, 2015. "The Journey to Inflation Targeting; Easier Said than Done The Case for Transitional Arrangements along the Road," IMF Working Papers 15/136, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Ricardo Reis, 2016. "Can the Central Bank Alleviate Fiscal Burdens?," NBER Working Papers 23014, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. World Bank, 2016. "Applying IFRS 9 to Central Banks Foreign Reserves," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23770, The World Bank.
    6. Benigno, Pierpaolo & Nisticò, Salvatore, 2015. "Non-Neutrality of Open-Market Operations," CEPR Discussion Papers 10594, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Studener, Werner & Merriman, Niall & Karakitsos, Polychronis & Bunea, Daniela, 2016. "Profit distribution and loss coverage rules for central banks," Occasional Paper Series 169, European Central Bank.
    8. Christiaan Pattipeilohy, 2016. "A comparative analysis of developments in central bank balance sheet composition," DNB Working Papers 510, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    9. Stephen Quinn & William Roberds, 2016. "Death of a Reserve Currency," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(4), pages 63-103, December.
    10. Julien Pinter, 2017. "Central bank financial strength and inflation: an empirical reassessment considering the key role of the fiscal support," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17055, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    11. Quinn, Stephen F. & Roberds, William, 2017. "An Early Experiment with "Permazero"," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2017-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    12. Bholat, David & Darbyshire, Robin, 2016. "Accounting in central banks," Bank of England working papers 604, Bank of England.
    13. Igor Goncharov & Vasso Ioannidou & Martin C. Schmalz, 2017. "(Why) Do Central Banks Care About Their Profits?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6546, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. William Roberds, 2016. "Review of Making Money: Coin, Currency, and the Coming of Capitalism by Christine Desan," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(3), pages 906-921, September.
    15. Schwarz Claudia & Karakitsos Polychronis & Merriman Niall & Studener Werner, 2015. "Why Accounting Matters: A Central Bank Perspective," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-42, March.
    16. Chan-Guk Huh, 2015. "Normalization of unconventional US monetary policy and its implications: Korea?s monetary policy case," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 2504115, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    17. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69, November.
    18. Michal Franta & Tomas Holub & Petr Kral & Ivana Kubicova & Katerina Smidkova & Borek Vasicek, 2014. "The Exchange Rate as an Instrument at Zero Interest Rates: The Case of the Czech Republic," Research and Policy Notes 2014/03, Czech National Bank, Research Department.

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