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Decoupling at the Margin: The Threat to Monetary Policy from the Electronic Revolution in Banking

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  • Benjamin M. Friedman

Abstract

The threat to monetary policy from the electronic revolution in banking is the possibility of a decoupling' of the operations of the central bank from markets in which financial claims are created and transacted in ways that, at some operative margin, affect the decisions of households and firms on such matters as how much to spend (and on what), how much (and what) to produce, and what to pay or charge for ordinary goods and services. The object of this paper is to discuss how this possibility arises and what it implies, to dismiss as unessential to the argument various extreme characterizations that have arisen in the recent debate on this issue (for example, that no one will use money for ordinary economic transactions), and to address the specific arguments on the issue offered by Charles Goodhart, Charles Freedman and Michael Woodford.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin M. Friedman, 2000. "Decoupling at the Margin: The Threat to Monetary Policy from the Electronic Revolution in Banking," NBER Working Papers 7955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7955 Note: ME
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Freedman, Charles, 2000. "Monetary Policy Implementation: Past, Present and Future--Will Electronic Money Lead to the Eventual Demise of Central Banking?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 211-227, July.
    2. Woodford, Michael, 2000. "Monetary Policy in a World without Money," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 229-260, July.
    3. Charles Goodhart, 2000. "Can Central Banking Survive the IT Revolution?," FMG Special Papers sp125, Financial Markets Group.
    4. Benjamin M. Friedman, 1999. "The Future of Monetary Policy: The Central Bank as an Army With Only a Signal Corps," NBER Working Papers 7420, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Friedman, Benjamin M, 1999. "The Future of Monetary Policy: The Central Bank as an Army with Only a Signal Corps?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 321-338, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bennett T. McCallum, 2004. "Monetary Policy In Economies With Little Or No Money," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 81-92, June.
    2. Daniel L. Thornton, 2006. "The daily liquidity effect," Working Papers 2006-020, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. Thornton, Daniel L., 2014. "Monetary policy: Why money matters (and interest rates don’t)," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 202-213.
    4. Claudio Sardoni, 2015. "The functions of money and the demand for liquidity," Working Papers 3/15, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    5. Ann Owen & Christopher Fogelstrom, 2005. "Monetary policy implications of electronic currency: an empirical analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(7), pages 419-423.
    6. McCallum, Bennett T. & Nelson, Edward, 2010. "Money and Inflation: Some Critical Issues," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 3, pages 97-153 Elsevier.
    7. Kotsemir, Maxim & Abroskin, Alexander, 2013. "Innovation Concepts and Typology – An Evolutionary Discussion," MPRA Paper 45069, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Bank for International Settlements, 2013. "Central bank finances," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 71, November.
    9. McCallum, Bennett T. & Nelson, Edward, 2010. "Money and Inflation: Some Critical Issues," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 3, pages 97-153 Elsevier.
    10. BENNETT T. McCALLUM, 2008. "How Important Is Money in the Conduct of Monetary Policy? A Comment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1783-1790, December.
    11. Michael Bordo & Andrew Filardo, 2005. "Deflation and monetary policy in a historical perspective: remembering the past or being condemned to repeat it?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 20(44), pages 799-844, October.
    12. Marco Arnone & Luca Bandiera, 2004. "Monetary Policy, Monetary Areas, and Financial Development with Electronic Money," IMF Working Papers 04/122, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Gilbert Cette & Christian Pfister, 2003. "The challenges of the "new economy" for monetary policy," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Monetary policy in a changing environment, volume 19, pages 213-233 Bank for International Settlements.
    14. Philip R. Lane, 2002. "Monetary-Fiscal Interactions in an Uncertain World: Lessons for European Policymakers," Trinity Economics Papers 200213, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    15. Hasan Cömert, 2012. "Decoupling between the Federal Funds Rate and Long-term Interest Rates: Decreasing Effectiveness of Monetary Policy in the U.S," Working Papers wp295, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    16. Helmut Wagner, 2005. "Globalization and financial instability: Challenges for exchange rate and monetary policy," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(7), pages 616-638, July.
    17. Helmut Wagner, 2001. "Implications of Globalization for Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 01/184, International Monetary Fund.
    18. Jan Marc Berk, 2002. "Central banking and financial innovation. A survey of the modern literature," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 55(222), pages 263-297.
    19. C. Sardoni, 2006. "Why Central Banks (and Money) Rule the Roost," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_457, Levy Economics Institute.
    20. Stephen G. Cecchetti, 2006. "The New Economy and the Challenges for Macroeconomic Policy," Chapters,in: The New Economy and Beyond, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    21. Jan Marc Berk, 2002. "Central banking and financial innovation. A survey of the modern literature," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 55(222), pages 263-297.
    22. Jan Marc Berk, 2002. "Banca centrale e innovazione finanziaria. Una rassegna della letteratura recente," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 55(220), pages 345-385.
    23. Korhonen, Tapio, 2001. "Finnish monetary and foreign exchange policy and the changeover to the euro," Research Discussion Papers 25/2001, Bank of Finland.
    24. José Manuel Gutiérrez, 2008. "A Frictionless Economy With Subotimizing Agents," Vienna Economics Papers 0811, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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