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Systemic capital requirements

In: Macroprudential regulation and policy

Author

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  • Lewis Webber

    (Bank of England)

  • Matthew Willison

    (Bank of England)

Abstract

The credit risk that an individual bank poses to the rest of the financial system depends on its size, the type of exposures it has to the real economy, and its obligations to other institutions. This paper describes a system-wide risk management approach to calibrating individual banks’ capital requirements that takes into account these factors and which correspond to a policymaker’s chosen target for systemic credit risk. The optimisation strategy identifies the minimum level of aggregate capital for the system and its distribution across banks that are consistent with a chosen objective for systemic credit risk. This parameterises a trade-off between efficiency and stability.
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Suggested Citation

  • Lewis Webber & Matthew Willison, 2011. "Systemic capital requirements," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Macroprudential regulation and policy, volume 60, pages 44-50 Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbpc:60-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anat R. Admati & Peter M. DeMarzo & Martin F. Hellwig & Paul Pfleiderer, 2010. "Fallacies, Irrelevant Facts, and Myths in the Discussion of Capital Regulation: Why Bank Equity is Not Expensive," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2010_42, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    2. Prasanna Gai & Nigel Jenkinson & Sujit Kapadia, 2007. "Systemic risk in modern financial systems: analytics and policy design," Journal of Risk Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 8(2), pages 156-165, March.
    3. Lelyveld, Iman van & Liedorp, Franka, 2004. "Interbank Contagion in the Dutch Banking Sector," MPRA Paper 651, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Jul 2005.
    4. Iman van Lelyveld & Franka Liedorp, 2006. "Interbank Contagion in the Dutch Banking Sector: A Sensitivity Analysis," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(2), May.
    5. Upper, Christian, 2011. "Simulation methods to assess the danger of contagion in interbank markets," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 111-125, August.
    6. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Using Market Information for Banking System Risk Assessment," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(1), March.
    7. Larry Eisenberg & Thomas H. Noe, 2001. "Systemic Risk in Financial Systems," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(2), pages 236-249, February.
    8. Piergiorgio Alessandri & Prasanna Gai & Sujit Kapadia & Nada Mora & Claus Puhr, 2009. "Towards a Framework for Quantifying Systemic Stability," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 5(3), pages 47-81, September.
    9. Celine Gauthier & Alfred Lehar & Moez Souissi, 2010. "Macroprudential Regulation and Systemic Capital Requirements," Staff Working Papers 10-4, Bank of Canada.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Lipton, 2016. "Modern Monetary Circuit Theory, Stability Of Interconnected Banking Network, And Balance Sheet Optimization For Individual Banks," International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance (IJTAF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 19(06), pages 1-57, September.
    2. Adrian Alter & Ben R. Craig & Peter Raupach, 2015. "Centrality-Based Capital Allocations," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(3), pages 329-377, June.
    3. Löffler, Gunter & Raupach, Peter, 2013. "Robustness and informativeness of systemic risk measures," Discussion Papers 04/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    4. Doris Neuberger & Roger Rissi, 2014. "Macroprudential Banking Regulation: Does One Size Fit All?," Journal of Banking and Financial Economics, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 1(1), pages 5-28, May.
    5. Andrey Itkin & Alexander Lipton, 2014. "Efficient solution of structural default models with correlated jumps and mutual obligations," Papers 1408.6513, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2014.
    6. Alexander Lipton, 2015. "Modern Monetary Circuit Theory, Stability of Interconnected Banking Network, and Balance Sheet Optimization for Individual Banks," Papers 1510.07608, arXiv.org.
    7. Jochen Schanz & David Aikman & Paul Collazos & Marc Farag & David Gregory & Sujit Kapadia, 2011. "The long-term economic impact of higher capital levels," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Macroprudential regulation and policy, volume 60, pages 73-81 Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Garratt, Rodney & Webber, Lewis & Willison, Matthew, 2012. "Using Shapley’s asymmetric power index to measure banks’ contributions to systemic risk," Bank of England working papers 468, Bank of England.
    9. Andrey Itkin & Alexander Lipton, 2017. "Structural default model with mutual obligations," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 15-46, April.
    10. Bardoscia, Marco & Barucca, Paolo & Brinley Codd, Adam & Hill, John, 2017. "The decline of solvency contagion risk," Bank of England working papers 662, Bank of England.
    11. Dimitri G Demekas, 2015. "Designing Effective Macroprudential Stress Tests; Progress So Far and the Way Forward," IMF Working Papers 15/146, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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