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Interbank Contagion in the Dutch Banking Sector

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  • Lelyveld, Iman van
  • Liedorp, Franka

Abstract

We investigate interlinkages and contagion risks in the Dutch interbank market. Based on several data sources, including the answers of banks to a questionnaire, we estimate the exposures in the interbank market at bank level. Next, we perform a scenario analysis to measure contagion risks. We find that the bankruptcy of one of the large banks will put a considerable burden on the other banks, but will not lead to a complete collapse of the interbank market. The contagion effects of the failure of a smaller bank are limited. The exposures to foreign counterparties are large and warrant further research. An important contribution of this paper is that we show, using survey data, that the entropy estimation using large exposures data as applied in many previous papers gives an adequate approximation of the actual linkages between banks. Hence, this methodology does not seem to introduce a bias.

Suggested Citation

  • Lelyveld, Iman van & Liedorp, Franka, 2004. "Interbank Contagion in the Dutch Banking Sector," MPRA Paper 651, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Jul 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:651
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. C. H. Furfine, 1999. "Interbank exposures: quantifying the risk of contagion," BIS Working Papers 70, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. De Bandt, Olivier & Hartmann, Philipp, 2000. "Systemic risk: A survey," Working Paper Series 0035, European Central Bank.
    3. Upper, Christian & Worms, Andreas, 2004. "Estimating bilateral exposures in the German interbank market: Is there a danger of contagion?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 827-849, August.
    4. Simon Wells, 2004. "Financial interlinkages in the United Kingdom's interbank market and the risk of contagion," Bank of England working papers 230, Bank of England.
    5. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    6. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Risk Assessment for Banking Systems," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(9), pages 1301-1314, September.
    7. Rodrigo Cifuentes & Hyun Song Shin & Gianluigi Ferrucci, 2005. "Liquidity Risk and Contagion," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 556-566, 04/05.
    8. James, Christopher, 1991. " The Losses Realized in Bank Failures," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1223-1242, September.
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    10. George Sheldon & Martin Maurer, 1998. "Interbank Lending and Systemic Risk: An Empirical Analysis for Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 134(IV), pages 685-704, December.
    11. Degryse, H.A. & Nguyen, G., 2004. "Interbank Exposures : An Empirical Examination of Systemic Risk in the Belgian Banking System," Discussion Paper 2004-4, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Upper, 2007. "Using counterfactual simulations to assess the danger of contagion in interbank markets," BIS Working Papers 234, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Elisabeth Ledrut, 2007. "Simulating retaliation in payment systems: Can banks control their exposure to a failing participant?," DNB Working Papers 133, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Philipp Hartmann & Stefan Straetmans & Casper de Vries, 2007. "Banking System Stability. A Cross-Atlantic Perspective," NBER Chapters,in: The Risks of Financial Institutions, pages 133-192 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Marc Pröpper & Iman van Lelyveld & Ronald Heijmans, 2008. "Towards a Network Description of Interbank Payment Flows," DNB Working Papers 177, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. Mark Mink, 2010. "Do Financial Markets Expect Bank Defaults to be Contagious?," DNB Working Papers 274, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    6. Fecht, Falko & Grüner, Hans Peter & Hartmann, Philipp, 2012. "Financial integration, specialization, and systemic risk," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 150-161.
    7. Christoph Memmel & Angelika Sachs & Ingrid Stein, 2012. "Contagion in the Interbank Market with Stochastic Loss Given Default," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(3), pages 177-206, September.
    8. Ben Craig & Martín Saldías, 2016. "Spatial Dependence and Data-Driven Networks of International Banks," IMF Working Papers 16/184, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Gabriele Visentin & Stefano Battiston & Marco D'Errico, 2016. "Rethinking Financial Contagion," Papers 1608.07831, arXiv.org.
    10. Mistrulli, Paolo Emilio, 2011. "Assessing financial contagion in the interbank market: Maximum entropy versus observed interbank lending patterns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 1114-1127, May.
    11. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Using Market Information for Banking System Risk Assessment," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(1), March.
    12. Prasanna Gai & Sujit Kapadia, 2011. "A Network Model of Super-Systemic Crises," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Rodrigo Alfaro (ed.), Financial Stability, Monetary Policy, and Central Banking, edition 1, volume 15, chapter 13, pages 411-432 Central Bank of Chile.
    13. Arribas, Iván & Pérez, Francisco & Tortosa-Ausina, Emili, 2011. "A network perspective on international banking integration," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 831-851.
    14. Memmel, Christoph & Sachs, Angelika & Stein, Ingrid, 2011. "Contagion at the interbank market with stochastic LGD," Discussion Paper Series 2: Banking and Financial Studies 2011,06, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    15. Lewis Webber & Matthew Willison, 2011. "Systemic capital requirements," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Macroprudential regulation and policy, volume 60, pages 44-50 Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Michael Koetter & Tigran Poghosyan & Thomas Kick, 2010. "Recovery Determinants of Distressed Banks; Regulators, Market Discipline, or the Environment?," IMF Working Papers 10/27, International Monetary Fund.
    17. G. Wims & D. Martens & M. De Backer, 2011. "Network Models of Financial Contagion: A Definition and Literature Review," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 11/730, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    18. Martin Brown & Stefan Trautmann & Razvan Vlahu, 2012. "Contagious Bank Runs: Experimental Evidence," DNB Working Papers 363, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    19. K. Minderhoud, 2006. "Systemic Risk in the Dutch Financial Sector," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(2), pages 177-195, June.
    20. Castrén, Olli & Rancan, Michela, 2013. "Macro-networks: an application to the euro area financial accounts," Working Paper Series 1510, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    interbank market; contagion; simulation;

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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