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Yvonne Stolz

Personal Details

First Name:Yvonne
Middle Name:
Last Name:Stolz
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst694
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2011 Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät; Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen

Tübingen, Germany
http://www.wiwi.uni-tuebingen.de/

:
+49 7071 - 29 72973
Nauklerstr. 47, 72074 Tübingen
RePEc:edi:wftuede (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Yvonne Stolz & Jörg Baten, 2012. "Brain Drain in the Age of Mass Migration: Does Relative Inequality Explain Migrant Selectivity?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3705, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Jörg & Botelho, Tarcísio, 2011. "Growth effects of 19th century mass migrations: "Fome Zero" for Brazil," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 20, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.

Articles

  1. Yvonne Stolz & Joerg Baten & Jaime Reis, 2013. "Portuguese living standards, 1720–1980, in European comparison: heights, income, and human capital," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(2), pages 545-578, May.
  2. Yvonne Stolz & Joerg Baten & Tarcísio Botelho, 2013. "Growth effects of nineteenth-century mass migrations: 'Fome Zero' for Brazil?," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 95-121, February.
  3. Kerstin Manzel & Joerg Baten & Yvonne Stolz, 2012. "Convergence and divergence of numeracy: the development of age heaping in Latin America from the seventeenth to the twentieth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(3), pages 932-960, August.
  4. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Joerg, 2012. "Brain drain in the age of mass migration: Does relative inequality explain migrant selectivity?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-220.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Yvonne Stolz & Jörg Baten, 2012. "Brain Drain in the Age of Mass Migration: Does Relative Inequality Explain Migrant Selectivity?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3705, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Steinberg, Daniel, 2017. "Resource shocks and human capital stocks – Brain drain or brain gain?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 250-268.
    2. Juif, Dácil & Quiroga, Gloria, 2019. "Do you have to be tall and educated to be a migrant? Evidence from Spanish recruitment records, 1890–1950," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 115-124.
    3. Ward, Zachary, 2017. "Birds of passage: Return migration, self-selection and immigration quotas," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 37-52.
    4. Blanca Sánchez‐Alonso, 2019. "The age of mass migration in Latin America," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 3-31, February.
    5. Ruhose, Jens & Parey, Matthias & Waldinger, Fabian & Netz, Nicolai, 2015. "The Selection of High-Skilled Migrants," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113148, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Zachary Ward, 2015. "The U-Shaped Self-Selection of Return Migrants," CEH Discussion Papers 035, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. Michael Landesmann & Sandra M. Leitner & Isilda Mara, 2015. "Intra-EU Mobility and Push and Pull Factors in EU Labour Markets: Estimating a Panel VAR Model," wiiw Working Papers 120, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    8. Miguel Flores & Alexander Patt & Jens Ruhose & Simon Wiederhold, 2017. "International Emigrant Selection on Occupational Skills," CID Working Papers 84a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    9. Blum, Matthias, 2013. "The influence of inequality on the standard of living: Worldwide anthropometric evidence from the 19th and 20th centuries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 436-452.
    10. Blum, Matthias & Rei, Claudia, 2016. "Escaping the Holocaust: human and health capital of refugees to the US, 1940-42," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145483, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Dribe, Martin & Eriksson, Björn & Scalone, Francesco, 2019. "Migration, marriage and social mobility: Women in Sweden 1880–1900," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 93-111.
    12. Blum, Matthias & Rei, Claudia, 2015. "Escaping the Holocaust: Human and health capital of refugees to the United States, 1940-42," QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-08, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    13. Renner, Laura & Krieger, Tim & Ruhose, Jens, 2014. "Culture, Selection, and International Migration," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100434, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Jörg & Botelho, Tarcísio, 2011. "Growth effects of 19th century mass migrations: "Fome Zero" for Brazil," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 20, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.
    15. Blum, Matthias, 2014. "Estimating male and female height inequality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 103-108.
    16. Timothy J Hatton & Zachary Ward, 2018. "International Migration in the Atlantic Economy 1850 - 1940," CEH Discussion Papers 02, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    17. Santiago Pérez, 2019. "Southern (American) Hospitality: Italians in Argentina and the US during the Age of Mass Migration," NBER Working Papers 26127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Massey, Catherine G., 2016. "Immigration quotas and immigrant selection," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 21-40.
    19. Timothy J. Hatton, 2019. "Emigration from the UK 1870-1913: Quantity and Quality," CEH Discussion Papers 07, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    20. Matthias Blum & Christopher L. Colvin & Laura McAtackney & Eoin McLaughlin, 2017. "Women of an uncertain age: quantifying human capital accumulation in rural Ireland in the nineteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(1), pages 187-223, February.
    21. Blum, Matthias & Krauss, Karl-Peter, 2017. "Age heaping and numeracy: Looking behind the curtain," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2017-05, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    22. Krieger, Tim & Renner, Laura & Ruhose, Jens, 2015. "Genetic distance and international migrant selection," Discussion Paper Series 2015-05, University of Freiburg, Wilfried Guth Endowed Chair for Constitutional Political Economy and Competition Policy.
    23. Spitzer, Yannay & Zimran, Ariell, 2018. "Migrant self-selection: Anthropometric evidence from the mass migration of Italians to the United States, 1907–1925," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 226-247.

  2. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Jörg & Botelho, Tarcísio, 2011. "Growth effects of 19th century mass migrations: "Fome Zero" for Brazil," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 20, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Gabriel Witzel de Souza, 2016. "Immigration and the Path-Dependence of Education: German-Speaking Immigrants, On-the-Job Skills, and Ethnic Schools in São Paulo, Brazil (1840-1920)," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 234, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    2. de Carvalho Filho, Irineu & Monasterio, Leonardo, 2012. "Immigration and the origins of regional inequality: Government-sponsored European migration to southern Brazil before World War I," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 794-807.
    3. Bruno Gabriel Witzel de Souza, 2016. "Subsidies to the History of the German-Speaking Immigration to the Province / State of São Paulo, Brazil (1840-1920)," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 233, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

Articles

  1. Yvonne Stolz & Joerg Baten & Jaime Reis, 2013. "Portuguese living standards, 1720–1980, in European comparison: heights, income, and human capital," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(2), pages 545-578, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia & Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat, 2018. "Two stories, one fate: Age-heaping and literacy in Spain, 1877-1930," Working Papers 0139, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Jaime Reis, 2016. "The Gross Agricultural Output of Portugal: A Quantitative, Unified Perspective, 1500-1850," Working Papers 0098, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Jörg Baten & Mikołaj Szołtysek, 2012. "The human capital of Central-Eastern and Eastern Europe in European perspective," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-002, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Palma, Nuno Pedro G. & Reis, Jaime Brown, 2018. "Can autocracy promote literacy? evidence from a cultural alignment success story," CEPR Discussion Papers 12811, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Schneider, Eric B. & Ogasawara, Kota, 2018. "Disease and child growth in industrialising Japan: Critical windows and the growth pattern, 1917–39," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 64-80.
    6. J. R. Ward, 2018. "The amelioration of British West Indian slavery: anthropometric evidence," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1199-1226, November.
    7. Jörg Baten & Mikołaj Szołtysek, 2014. "A golden age before serfdom? The human capital of Central-Eastern and Eastern Europe in the 17th-19th centuries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2014-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    8. Blum, Matthias & Krauss, Karl-Peter, 2017. "Age heaping and numeracy: Looking behind the curtain," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2017-05, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    9. Schneider, Eric B. & Ogasawara, Kota, 2017. "Disease and child growth in industrialising Japan: assessing instantaneous changes in growth and changes in the growth pattern, 1911-39," Economic History Working Papers 84066, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    10. Nuno Palma & Jaime Reis & Mengtian Zhang, 2019. "Reconstruction of regional and national population using intermittent census-type data: the case of Portugal, 1527-1864," Working Papers 0168, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  2. Yvonne Stolz & Joerg Baten & Tarcísio Botelho, 2013. "Growth effects of nineteenth-century mass migrations: 'Fome Zero' for Brazil?," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 95-121, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Juif, Dácil & Quiroga, Gloria, 2019. "Do you have to be tall and educated to be a migrant? Evidence from Spanish recruitment records, 1890–1950," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 115-124.
    2. Blanca Sánchez‐Alonso, 2019. "The age of mass migration in Latin America," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 3-31, February.
    3. Johan Fourie & Dieter Fintel, 2014. "Settler skills and colonial development: the Huguenot wine-makers in eighteenth-century Dutch South Africa," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 932-963, November.
    4. Bruno Gabriel Witzel de Souza, 2018. "Immigration and the path dependence of education: the case of German†speakers in São Paulo, Brazil (1840–1920)," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(2), pages 506-539, May.
    5. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    6. Monasterio, Leonardo & Lopes, Daniel, 2018. "Brasil sem imigrantes: estimativas de longo prazo baseadas em microdados
      [Brazil without immigrants: microdata long run estimates]
      ," MPRA Paper 88170, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Blum, Matthias & Krauss, Karl-Peter, 2017. "Age heaping and numeracy: Looking behind the curtain," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2017-05, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    8. Ehrl, Philipp & Monteiro Monasterio, Leonardo, 2016. "Historical trades, skills and agglomeration economies," MPRA Paper 69829, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  3. Kerstin Manzel & Joerg Baten & Yvonne Stolz, 2012. "Convergence and divergence of numeracy: the development of age heaping in Latin America from the seventeenth to the twentieth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(3), pages 932-960, August.

    Cited by:

    1. María Camou, 2018. "Family formation, gender and labour during the First Globalization in Montevideo, Uruguay," Documentos de trabajo 50, Programa de Historia Económica, FCS, Udelar.
    2. Friesen, Julia & Baten, Jörg & Prayon, Valeria, 2012. "Women Count: Gender (in-)equalities in the human capital development in Asia, 1900-60," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 29, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.
    3. Èric Gómez-i-Aznar, 2019. "Human capital at the beginnings of the 18th century Catalonia: age-heaping and numeracy in a changing economy," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1904, Asociación Española de Historia Económica.
    4. Brian A'Hearn & Alexia Delfino & Alessandro Nuvolari, 2016. "Rethinking Age-heaping, a Cautionary Tale From Nineteenth Century Italy," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _148, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Jörg & Botelho, Tarcísio, 2011. "Growth effects of 19th century mass migrations: "Fome Zero" for Brazil," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 20, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.
    6. Baten, Joerg & Sohn, Kitae, 2013. "Back to the 'normal' level of human-capital driven growth? A note on early numeracy in Korea, China and Japan, 1550 - 1800," University of Tübingen Working Papers in Business and Economics 52, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics.
    7. Baten, Joerg & Juif, Dácil, 2014. "A story of large landowners and math skills: Inequality and human capital formation in long-run development, 1820–2000," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 375-401.
    8. Jörg Baten & Johan Fourie, 2012. "Slave numeracy in the Cape Colony and comparative development in the eighteenth century," Working Papers 270, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    9. Jörg Baten & Johan Fourie, 2015. "Numeracy of Africans, Asians, and Europeans during the early modern period: new evidence from Cape Colony court registers," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(2), pages 632-656, May.

  4. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Joerg, 2012. "Brain drain in the age of mass migration: Does relative inequality explain migrant selectivity?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-220. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2011-12-13. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2011-12-13. Author is listed
  3. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2011-12-13. Author is listed

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