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Estimating male and female height inequality

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  • Blum, Matthias

Abstract

This study investigates the coefficient of variation (CV) of height of males and females as a measure of inequality. We have collected a data set on corresponding male and female height CVs from 124 populations, spanning the period between the 1840s and 1980s. The results suggest that the R2 between the two CVs is 0.39, with the male CV being greater, indicating higher plasticity.

Suggested Citation

  • Blum, Matthias, 2014. "Estimating male and female height inequality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 103-108.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:14:y:2014:i:c:p:103-108
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2013.03.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark E. McGovern & Aditi Krishna & Victor M. Aguayo & S.V. Subramanian, 2017. "A Review of the Evidence Linking Child Stunting to Economic Outcomes," CHaRMS Working Papers 17-03, Centre for HeAlth Research at the Management School (CHaRMS).
    2. Ramon Ramon-Muñoz & Josep-Maria Ramon-Muñoz, 2015. "Height and Industrialisation in a City in Catalonia during the Nineteenth Century," UB Economics Working Papers 2015/334, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.

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