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Steven Michael Smith

Not to be confused with: Stephen C. Smith, Stephen L. S. Smith, Stephen Smith

Personal Details

First Name:Steven
Middle Name:Michael
Last Name:Smith
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psm211
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Division of Economics and Business
Colorado School of Mines

Golden, Colorado (United States)
http://econbus.mines.edu/
RePEc:edi:decsmus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "From Decentralized to Centralized Irrigation Management," Working Papers 2017-09, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
  2. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "Economic Incentives and Conservation: Crowding-in Social Norms in a Groundwater Commons," Working Papers 2017-08, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
  3. Lee J. Alston & Krister Andersson & Steven M. Smith, 2013. "Payment for Environmental Services: Hypotheses and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 18740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Smith, Steven M., 2018. "From decentralized to centralized irrigation management," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 62-87.
  2. Edwards, Eric C. & Smith, Steven M., 2018. "The Role of Irrigation in the Development of Agriculture in the United States," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(4), pages 1103-1141, December.
  3. Smith, Steven M., 2018. "Economic incentives and conservation: Crowding-in social norms in a groundwater commons," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 147-174.
  4. Steven M. Smith & Krister Andersson & Kelsey C. Cody & Michael Cox & Darren Ficklin, 2017. "Responding to a Groundwater Crisis: The Effects of Self-Imposed Economic Incentives," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(4), pages 985-1023.
  5. Steven M. Smith, 2016. "Common Property Resources and New Entrants: Uncovering the Bias and Effects of New Users," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-36.
  6. Lee J. Alston & Krister Andersson & Steven M. Smith, 2013. "Payment for Environmental Services: Hypotheses and Evidence," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 5(1), pages 139-159, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "From Decentralized to Centralized Irrigation Management," Working Papers 2017-09, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.

    Cited by:

    1. Michler, Jeffrey D. & Wu, Steven Y., 2020. "Governance and contract choice: Theory and evidence from groundwater irrigation markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 129-147.
    2. Smith, Steven M., 2021. "The relative economic merits of alternative water right systems," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 105(C).
    3. Chai, Ying & Zhang, Haoran & Luo, Yong & Wang, Yi & Zeng, Yunmin, 2021. "Payments for ecosystem services programs, institutional bricolage, and common pool resource management: Evidence from village collective-managed irrigation systems in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 182(C).

  2. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "Economic Incentives and Conservation: Crowding-in Social Norms in a Groundwater Commons," Working Papers 2017-08, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.

    Cited by:

    1. Vallury, Sechindra & Abbott, Joshua K. & Shin, Hoon C. & Anderies, John M., 2020. "Sustaining Coupled Irrigation Infrastructures: Multiple Instruments for Multiple Dilemmas," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 178(C).
    2. Backstrom, Jesse, 2019. "Strategic Reporting and the Effects of Water Use in Hydraulic Fracturing on Local Groundwater Levels in Texas," Center for Growth and Opportunity at Utah State University 307177, Center for Growth and Opportunity.
    3. Manning, Dale T. & Rad, Mani Rouhi & Suter, Jordan F. & Goemans, Christopher & Xiang, Zaichen & Bailey, Ryan, 2020. "Non-market valuation in integrated assessment modeling: The benefits of water right retirement," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 103(C).

  3. Lee J. Alston & Krister Andersson & Steven M. Smith, 2013. "Payment for Environmental Services: Hypotheses and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 18740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Krister P. & Smith, Steven M. & Alston, Lee J. & Duchelle, Amy E. & Mwangi, Esther & Larson, Anne M. & de Sassi, Claudio & Sills, Erin O. & Sunderlin, William D. & Wong, Grace Y., 2018. "Wealth and the distribution of benefits from tropical forests: Implications for REDD+," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 510-522.
    2. Fauzi, Akhmad & Anna, Zuzy, 2013. "The complexity of the institution of payment for environmental services: A case study of two Indonesian PES schemes," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 54-63.
    3. Gary D. Libecap, 2014. "Addressing Global Environmental Externalities: Transaction Costs Considerations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(2), pages 424-479, June.
    4. Ola, Oreoluwa & Menapace, Luisa & Benjamin, Emmanuel & Lang, Hannes, 2019. "Determinants of the environmental conservation and poverty alleviation objectives of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) programs," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 52-66.
    5. Chervier, Colas & Costedoat, Sébastien, 2017. "Heterogeneous Impact of a Collective Payment for Environmental Services Scheme on Reducing Deforestation in Cambodia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 148-159.
    6. Sandi Matsumoto & Melissa M. Rohde & Sarah Heard, 2019. "Policy Note: "Economic Tools to Achieve Groundwater Sustainability for Nature: Two Experimental Case Studies from California"," Water Economics and Policy (WEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 5(04), pages 1-15, October.
    7. Do, Trong Hoan & Vu, Tan Phuong & Nguyen, Van Truong & Catacutan, Delia, 2018. "Payment for forest environmental services in Vietnam: An analysis of buyers’ perspectives and willingness," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 32(PA), pages 134-143.
    8. Teo Dang Do & Anchana NaRanong, 2019. "Livelihood and Environmental Impacts of Payments for Forest Environmental Services: A Case Study in Vietnam," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(15), pages 1-22, August.
    9. Bennett, Drew E. & Gosnell, Hannah, 2015. "Integrating multiple perspectives on payments for ecosystem services through a social–ecological systems framework," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 172-181.
    10. Martin, Paul V., 2018. "Managing the risks of ecosystem services markets," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 29(PB), pages 404-410.
    11. Hao Wang & Sander Meijerink & Erwin van der Krabben, 2020. "Institutional Design and Performance of Markets for Watershed Ecosystem Services: A Systematic Literature Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(16), pages 1-26, August.
    12. Chabé-Ferret, Sylvain & Voia, Anca, 2019. "Are Grassland Conservation Programs a Cost-Effective Way to Fight Climate Change? Evidence from France," SocArXiv cx8j6, Center for Open Science.
    13. Campanhão, Ligia Maria Barrios & Ranieri, Victor Eduardo Lima, 2019. "Guideline framework for effective targeting of payments for watershed services," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 93-109.

Articles

  1. Smith, Steven M., 2018. "From decentralized to centralized irrigation management," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 62-87.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Edwards, Eric C. & Smith, Steven M., 2018. "The Role of Irrigation in the Development of Agriculture in the United States," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(4), pages 1103-1141, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "From Decentralized to Centralized Irrigation Management," Working Papers 2017-09, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    2. Tran, Dat Q. & Kovacs, Kent & Wallander, Steven, 2020. "Optimal groundwater augmentation through managed aquifer recharge and on-farm reservoir under uncertainty and risk," 2020 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, Kansas City, Missouri 304295, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Ariel Ortiz-Bobea, 2021. "Climate, Agriculture and Food," Papers 2105.12044, arXiv.org.
    4. Jesus Arellano‐Gonzalez & Frances C. Moore, 2020. "Intertemporal Arbitrage of Water and Long‐Term Agricultural Investments: Drought, Groundwater Banking, and Perennial Cropping Decisions in California," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 102(5), pages 1368-1382, October.
    5. Mullally, Conner & Chakravarty, Shourish, 2018. "Are Matching Funds for Smallholder Irrigation Money Well Spent?," SocArXiv x5vmz, Center for Open Science.

  3. Smith, Steven M., 2018. "Economic incentives and conservation: Crowding-in social norms in a groundwater commons," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 147-174.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Steven M. Smith & Krister Andersson & Kelsey C. Cody & Michael Cox & Darren Ficklin, 2017. "Responding to a Groundwater Crisis: The Effects of Self-Imposed Economic Incentives," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(4), pages 985-1023.

    Cited by:

    1. Vallury, Sechindra & Abbott, Joshua K. & Shin, Hoon C. & Anderies, John M., 2020. "Sustaining Coupled Irrigation Infrastructures: Multiple Instruments for Multiple Dilemmas," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 178(C).
    2. Louis Sears & David Lim & C.-Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell, 2018. "The Economics of Agricultural Groundwater Management Institutions: The Case of California," Water Economics and Policy (WEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(03), pages 1-21, July.
    3. Ayres, Andrew B. & Edwards, Eric C. & Libecap, Gary D., 2018. "How transaction costs obstruct collective action: The case of California's groundwater," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 46-65.
    4. Drysdale, Krystal M. & Hendricks, Nathan P., 2018. "Adaptation to an irrigation water restriction imposed through local governance," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 150-165.
    5. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "Economic Incentives and Conservation: Crowding-in Social Norms in a Groundwater Commons," Working Papers 2017-08, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    6. Andrew B. Rosenberg, 2020. "Targeting of Water Rights Retirement Programs: Evidence from Kansas," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 102(5), pages 1425-1447, October.
    7. Perez-Quesada, Gabriela & Hendricks, Nathan P., 2019. "Lessons from local governance and collective action efforts to manage irrigation withdrawals in Kansas," 2019 Annual Meeting, July 21-23, Atlanta, Georgia 291224, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Rouhi Rad, Mani & Brozović, Nicholas & Foster, Timothy & Mieno, Taro, 2020. "Effects of instantaneous groundwater availability on irrigated agriculture and implications for aquifer management," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C).
    9. Louis Sears & Joseph Caparelli & Clouse Lee & Devon Pan & Gillian Strandberg & Linh Vuu & C. -Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell, 2018. "Jevons’ Paradox and Efficient Irrigation Technology," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-12, May.
    10. Bruno, Ellen M. & Jessoe, Katrina, 2021. "Missing markets: Evidence on agricultural groundwater demand from volumetric pricing," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 196(C).
    11. Ellen M. Bruno & Richard J. Sexton, 2020. "The Gains from Agricultural Groundwater Trade and the Potential for Market Power: Theory and Application," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 102(3), pages 884-910, May.
    12. de Bonviller, Simon & Wheeler, Sarah Ann & Zuo, Alec, 2020. "The dynamics of groundwater markets: Price leadership and groundwater demand elasticity in the Murrumbidgee, Australia," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 239(C).
    13. Jordan F. Suter & Sam Collie & Kent D. Messer & Joshua M. Duke & Holly A. Michael, 2019. "Common Pool Resource Management at the Extensive and Intensive Margins: Experimental Evidence," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 73(4), pages 973-993, August.

  5. Steven M. Smith, 2016. "Common Property Resources and New Entrants: Uncovering the Bias and Effects of New Users," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-36.

    Cited by:

    1. Steven M. Smith, 2017. "From Decentralized to Centralized Irrigation Management," Working Papers 2017-09, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    2. Perez-Quesada, Gabriela & Hendricks, Nathan P., 2019. "Lessons from local governance and collective action efforts to manage irrigation withdrawals in Kansas," 2019 Annual Meeting, July 21-23, Atlanta, Georgia 291224, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Bryan Leonard & Gary D. Libecap, 2016. "Collective Action by Contract: Prior Appropriation and the Development of Irrigation in the Western United States," NBER Working Papers 22185, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  6. Lee J. Alston & Krister Andersson & Steven M. Smith, 2013. "Payment for Environmental Services: Hypotheses and Evidence," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 5(1), pages 139-159, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (3) 2013-02-03 2017-11-19 2017-11-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2013-02-03 2017-11-19. Author is listed
  3. NEP-RES: Resource Economics (2) 2013-02-03 2017-11-19. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2017-11-19. Author is listed

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