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Kathrin Schlafmann

Personal Details

First Name:Kathrin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Schlafmann
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc600
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/kathrinschlafmann/

Affiliation

Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES)
Stockholms Universitet

Stockholm, Sweden
http://www.iies.su.se/

: +46-8-162000
+46-8-161443
S-106 91 Stockholm
RePEc:edi:iiesuse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Rozsypal, Filip & Schlafmann, Kathrin, 2017. "Overpersistence Bias in Individual Income Expectations and its Aggregate Implications," CEPR Discussion Papers 12028, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Schlafmann, Kathrin, 2016. "Housing, Mortgages, and Self Control," CEPR Discussion Papers 11589, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Winter, Joachim & Schlafmann, Kathrin & Rodepeter, Ralf, 2011. "Rules of Thumb in Life-Cycle Saving Decisions," Discussion Papers in Economics 12334, University of Munich, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Joachim K. Winter & Kathrin Schlafmann & Ralf Rodepeter, 2012. "Rules of Thumb in Life‐cycle Saving Decisions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(560), pages 479-501, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Rozsypal, Filip & Schlafmann, Kathrin, 2017. "Overpersistence Bias in Individual Income Expectations and its Aggregate Implications," CEPR Discussion Papers 12028, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. David Altig & Jose Maria Barrero & Nicholas Bloom & Steven J. Davis & Brent H. Meyer & Nicholas Parker, 2019. "Surveying Business Uncertainty," NBER Working Papers 25956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Francesco D’Acunto & Daniel Hoang & Maritta Paloviita & Michael Weber, 2019. "IQ, Expectations, and Choice," NBER Working Papers 25496, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Massenot, Baptiste & Pettinicchi, Yuri, 2018. "Can households see into the future? Survey evidence from the Netherlands," SAFE Working Paper Series 233, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    4. Greg Howard & Carl Liebersohn, 2019. "What Explains U.S. House Prices? Regional Income Divergence," 2019 Meeting Papers 1054, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Sean Hundtofte & Arna Olafsson & Michaela Pagel, 2019. "Credit Smoothing," NBER Working Papers 26354, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Bassanin, Marzio & Faia, Ester & Patella, Valeria, 2019. "Ambiguity Attitudes, Leverage Cycle and Asset Prices," CEPR Discussion Papers 13875, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Anmol Bhandari & Jaroslav Borovicka & Paul Ho, 2019. "Survey Data and Subjective Beliefs in Business Cycle Models," Working Paper 19-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.

  2. Winter, Joachim & Schlafmann, Kathrin & Rodepeter, Ralf, 2011. "Rules of Thumb in Life-Cycle Saving Decisions," Discussion Papers in Economics 12334, University of Munich, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Binswanger, Johannes & Carman, Katherine Grace, 2012. "How real people make long-term decisions: The case of retirement preparation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 39-60.
    2. Landon, Stuart & Smith, Constance, 2014. "Rule-Based Resource Revenue Stabilization Funds: A Welfare Comparison," Working Papers 2014-1, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    3. Fabio C. Bagliano & Carolina Fugazza & Giovanna Nicodano, 2012. "Optimal life-cycle portfolios for heterogeneous workers," Working papers 012, Department of Economics and Statistics (Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-Sociali e Matematico-Statistiche), University of Torino.
    4. Geert Van Campenhout, 2015. "Revaluing the Role of Parents as Financial Socialization Agents in Youth Financial Literacy Programs," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 186-222, March.
    5. William L. Skimmyhorn & Evan R. Davies & David Mun & Brian Mitchell, 2016. "Assessing financial education methods: Principles vs. rules-of-thumb approaches," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(3), pages 193-210, July.
    6. Bettina Lamla, 2013. "Family background and the decision to provide for old age: a siblings approach," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 483-504, August.
    7. Massenot, Baptiste, 2019. "Pain of paying in a business cycle model," SAFE Working Paper Series 194, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    8. Dina Tasneem & Audrey Azerot & Marine de Montaignac & Jim Engle-Warnick, 2018. "A Laboratory Study of the Effect of Financial Literacy Training on Retirement Savings," CIRANO Working Papers 2018s-24, CIRANO.
    9. Shafique, Attayah & Ayub, Usman & Zakaria, Muhammad, 2019. "Don’t let the Greed catch you! Pleonexia rule applied to Pakistan stock exchange," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 524(C), pages 157-168.
    10. Dina Tasneem & Jim Engle-Warnick, 2018. "Decision Rules for Precautionary and Retirement Savings," CIRANO Working Papers 2018s-22, CIRANO.
    11. Grigoli, Francesco & Herman, Alexander & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 2018. "Saving in the world," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 257-270.
    12. Larin, Alexander & Novak, Anna & Khvostova, Irina, 2013. "Consumption dynamics in Russia: Estimates on microdata," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 32(4), pages 29-44.
    13. Koehler, Derek J. & Langstaff, Jesse & Liu, Wu-Qi, 2015. "A simulated financial savings task for studying consumption and retirement decision making," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 89-97.
    14. Määttänen, Niku & Alho, Juha, 2014. "Response to updated mortality forecasts in life cycle saving and labor supply," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1120-1127.

Articles

  1. Joachim K. Winter & Kathrin Schlafmann & Ralf Rodepeter, 2012. "Rules of Thumb in Life‐cycle Saving Decisions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(560), pages 479-501, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2016-11-06 2017-05-28. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2011-10-15. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2011-10-15. Author is listed
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2016-11-06. Author is listed

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