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Alicia Sasser Modestino

Personal Details

First Name:Alicia
Middle Name:Sasser
Last Name:Modestino
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo1225
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://aliciasassermodestino.com/
Twitter: @sassermodestino
Terminal Degree:2001 Department of Economics; Harvard University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(75%) School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
Northeastern University

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.northeastern.edu/policyschool/
RePEc:edi:spneuus (more details at EDIRC)

(25%) Department of Economics
Northeastern University

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
https://www.northeastern.edu/cssh/economics/
RePEc:edi:ecneuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Pascaline Dupas & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Muriel Niederle & Justin Wolfers & The Seminar Dynamics Collective, 2021. "Gender and the Dynamics of Economics Seminars," NBER Working Papers 28494, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mary A. Burke & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Shahriar Sadighi & Rachel B. Sederberg & Bledi Taska, 2019. "No Longer Qualified? Changes in the Supply and Demand for Skills within Occupations," Working Papers 20-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  3. Joshua Ballance & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Working Papers 16-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  4. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  5. Joshua Ballance & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  6. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "The impact of managed care on the gender earnings gap among physicians," Working Papers 13-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  7. Julia Dennett & Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "Uncertain futures?: youth attachment to the labor market in the United States and New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 13-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  8. Julia Dennett & Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  9. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2010. "Mismatch in the labor market: measuring the supply of and demand for skilled labor in New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 10-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  10. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Voting with their feet?: local economic conditions and migration patterns in New England," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 09-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  11. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 08-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  12. Alicia Sasser, 2007. "Reaching the goal: expanding health insurance coverage in New England: current strategies and new initiatives," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 07-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  13. Genia Long & David Cutler & Ernst R. Berndt & Jimmy Royer & Andrée-Anne Fournier & Alicia Sasser & Pierre Cremieux, 2006. "The Impact of Antihypertensive Drugs on the Number and Risk of Death, Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in the United States," NBER Working Papers 12096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Alicia Sasser, 2006. "The potential economic impact of increasing the minimum wage in Massachusetts," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  15. Darcy Rollins & Alicia Sasser & Robert Tannenwald & Bo Zhao, 2006. "The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  16. Tim Lake & Alicia Sasser & Cheryl Young & Brian Quinn, "undated". "A Snapshot of the Implementation of California's Mental Health Parity Law," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 49e9f795c3e34745a69acc93a, Mathematica Policy Research.

Articles

  1. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Urbashee Paul & Joseph McLaughlin, 2022. "What's in a Job? Evaluating the Effect of Private Sector Employment Experience on Student Academic Outcomes," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 112, pages 126-130, May.
  2. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag & Joshua Ballance, 2020. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(4), pages 793-805, October.
  3. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2019. "How Do Summer Youth Employment Programs Improve Criminal Justice Outcomes, and for Whom?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 38(3), pages 600-628, June.
  4. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Paulsen, Richard J., 2019. "Reducing inequality summer by summer: Lessons from an evaluation of the Boston Summer Youth Employment Program," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 40-53.
  5. Alicia S. Modestino & Rachel Sederberg & Liana Tuller, 2019. "Assessing the Effectiveness of Financial Coaching: Evidence from the Boston Youth Credit Building Initiative," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 1825-1873, December.
  6. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 333-347.
  7. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "Retaining recent college graduates in New England: an update on current trends," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  8. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "Uncertain futures: are American youth increasingly idle?: think again," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  9. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Dennett, Julia, 2013. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses? The impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 322-337.
  10. Julia Dennett & Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2011. "The middle-skills gap: ensuring an adequate supply of skilled labor in northern and southern New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  11. Sasser, Alicia C., 2010. "Voting with their feet: Relative economic conditions and state migration patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2-3), pages 122-135, May.
  12. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Retention of recent college graduates in New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  13. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Lasting connections: using internships to retain recent college graduates in New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  14. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "The supply of recent college graduates in New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  15. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of skilled labor: New England’s supply of recent college graduates," New England Economic Indicators, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Dec, pages 2-7.
  16. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates," Annual Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, pages 4-23.
  17. Darcy Rollins Saas & Alicia Sasser, 2007. "Crowded out of the housing market: declining affordability and availability are squeezing New England's very low-income households," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  18. Alicia Sasser, 2007. "The New England rental market," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  19. Alicia C. Sasser, 2005. "Gender Differences in Physician Pay: Tradeoffs Between Career and Family," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2006-03-18 2008-10-07 2012-05-02 2013-03-23
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2006-07-09 2009-07-28 2012-05-02 2015-05-09
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2006-04-01 2007-11-24 2013-03-23
  4. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2008-10-07 2015-09-05
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2009-07-28 2012-05-02
  6. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-03-23
  7. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2021-03-15
  8. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2006-07-09
  9. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2021-03-15
  10. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2006-04-01
  11. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2013-03-23
  12. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2009-07-28
  13. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2021-03-15
  14. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (1) 2016-10-02

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