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Alicia Sasser Modestino

Personal Details

First Name:Alicia
Middle Name:Sasser
Last Name:Modestino
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo1225
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://aliciasassermodestino.com/

Affiliation

(75%) School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
Northeastern University

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.northeastern.edu/policyschool/

:

360 Huntington Ave., Boston MA 02115
RePEc:edi:spneuus (more details at EDIRC)

(25%) Department of Economics
Northeastern University

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
https://www.northeastern.edu/cssh/economics/

: (617)373-2882
(617)373-3640
301 Lake hall, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115
RePEc:edi:ecneuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Working Papers 16-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  4. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "The impact of managed care on the gender earnings gap among physicians," Working Papers 13-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  5. Dennett, Julia & Modestino, Alicia Sasser, 2013. "Uncertain futures?: youth attachment to the labor market in the United States and New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 13-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  6. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Julia Dennett, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  7. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2010. "Mismatch in the labor market: measuring the supply of and demand for skilled labor in New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 10-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  8. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Voting with their feet?: local economic conditions and migration patterns in New England," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 09-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  9. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 08-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  10. Alicia Sasser, 2007. "Reaching the goal: expanding health insurance coverage in New England: current strategies and new initiatives," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 07-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  11. Genia Long & David Cutler & Ernst R. Berndt & Jimmy Royer & Andrée-Anne Fournier & Alicia Sasser & Pierre Cremieux, 2006. "The Impact of Antihypertensive Drugs on the Number and Risk of Death, Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in the United States," NBER Working Papers 12096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Alicia Sasser, 2006. "The potential economic impact of increasing the minimum wage in Massachusetts," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  13. Alicia Sasser & Bo Zhao & Darcy Rollins & Robert Tannenwald, 2006. "The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  14. Tim Lake & Alicia Sasser & Cheryl Young & Brian Quinn, "undated". "A Snapshot of the Implementation of California's Mental Health Parity Law," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 49e9f795c3e34745a69acc93a, Mathematica Policy Research.

Articles

  1. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2019. "How Do Summer Youth Employment Programs Improve Criminal Justice Outcomes, and for Whom?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 38(3), pages 600-628, June.
  2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Paulsen, Richard J., 2019. "Reducing inequality summer by summer: Lessons from an evaluation of the Boston Summer Youth Employment Program," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 40-53.
  3. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 333-347.
  4. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "Retaining recent college graduates in New England: an update on current trends," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  5. Modestino, Alicia Sasser, 2013. "Uncertain futures: are American youth increasingly idle?: think again," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  6. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Dennett, Julia, 2013. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses? The impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 322-337.
  7. Julia Dennett & Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2011. "The middle-skills gap: ensuring an adequate supply of skilled labor in northern and southern New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  8. Sasser, Alicia C., 2010. "Voting with their feet: Relative economic conditions and state migration patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2-3), pages 122-135, May.
  9. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Retention of recent college graduates in New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  10. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Lasting connections: using internships to retain recent college graduates in New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  11. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "The supply of recent college graduates in New England," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  12. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of skilled labor: New England’s supply of recent college graduates," New England Economic Indicators, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Dec, pages 2-7.
  13. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates," Annual Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, pages 4-23.
  14. Darcy Rollins Saas with Alicia Sasser, 2007. "Crowded out of the housing market: declining affordability and availability are squeezing New England's very low-income households," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  15. Alicia Sasser, 2007. "The New England rental market," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  16. Alicia C. Sasser, 2005. "Gender Differences in Physician Pay: Tradeoffs Between Career and Family," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Working Papers 16-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Grinis, Inna, 2017. "The STEM requirements of "non-STEM" jobs: evidence from UK online vacancy postings and implications for skills & knowledge shortages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85123, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Shrestha, Rashesh & Coxhead, Ian, 2018. "Export boom, employment bust? The paradox of Indonesia's displaced workers, 2000-14," CEI Working Paper Series 2018-6, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. ""No More Credit Score": Emplyer Credit Check Bans and Signal Substitution," Working Paper Series 16-008, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    4. Brad J. Hershbein & Lisa B. Kahn, "undated". "Do Recessions Accelerate Routine-Biased Technological Change? Evidence from Vacancy Postings," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles hk-18aer, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    5. Christopher Huckfeldt, 2018. "Understanding the Scarring Effect of Recessions," 2018 Meeting Papers 1207, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. José A. Azar & Ioana Marinescu & Marshall I. Steinbaum & Bledi Taska, 2018. "Concentration in US Labor Markets: Evidence From Online Vacancy Data," NBER Working Papers 24395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Pater, Robert & Szkola, Jaroslaw & Kozak, Marcin, 2019. "A method for measuring detailed demand for workers' competences," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 13, pages 1-30.
    8. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. "“No more credit score”: employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Working Papers 16-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

  2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

    Cited by:

    1. Daron Acemoglu & Pascual Restrepo, 2018. "Low-Skill and High-Skill Automation," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(2), pages 204-232.
    2. Grinis, Inna, 2017. "The STEM requirements of "non-STEM" jobs: evidence from UK online vacancy postings and implications for skills & knowledge shortages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85123, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. David Deming & Lisa B. Kahn, 2017. "Skill Requirements across Firms and Labor Markets: Evidence from Job Postings for Professionals," NBER Working Papers 23328, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Andreas Kettemann & Andreas I. Mueller & Josef Zweimüller, 2018. "Vacancy Durations and Entry Wages: Evidence from Linked Vacancy-Employer-Employee Data," NBER Working Papers 25118, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. ""No More Credit Score": Emplyer Credit Check Bans and Signal Substitution," Working Paper Series 16-008, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    6. Michael J. Handel & Alexandria Valerio & Maria Laura Sánchez Puerta, 2016. "Accounting for Mismatch in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 24906, September.
    7. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data," CEPS Papers 11406, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    8. Edward P. Lazear & Kathryn L. Shaw & Christopher T. Stanton, 2016. "Who Gets Hired? The Importance of Finding an Open Slot," NBER Working Papers 22202, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Claudia Macaluso, 2017. "Skill Remoteness and Post-layoff Labor Market Outcomes," 2017 Meeting Papers 569, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. "“No more credit score”: employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Working Papers 16-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

  3. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. ""No More Credit Score": Emplyer Credit Check Bans and Signal Substitution," Working Paper Series 16-008, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Michael J. Handel & Alexandria Valerio & Maria Laura Sánchez Puerta, 2016. "Accounting for Mismatch in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 24906, September.
    3. Brad J. Hershbein & Lisa B. Kahn, "undated". "Do Recessions Accelerate Routine-Biased Technological Change? Evidence from Vacancy Postings," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles hk-18aer, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data," CEPS Papers 11406, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    5. Karolien Lenaerts & Miroslav Beblavý & Brian Fabo, 2016. "Prospects for utilisation of non-vacancy Internet data in labour market analysis—an overview," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    6. Barbara Ermini & Luca Papi & Francesca Scaturro, 2017. "Over education and the great recession. The case of italian PH.D graduates," Working Papers 420, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    7. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. "“No more credit score”: employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Working Papers 16-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

  4. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "The impact of managed care on the gender earnings gap among physicians," Working Papers 13-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Alicia C. Sasser, 2005. "Gender Differences in Physician Pay: Tradeoffs Between Career and Family," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).

  5. Dennett, Julia & Modestino, Alicia Sasser, 2013. "Uncertain futures?: youth attachment to the labor market in the United States and New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 13-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. International Labour Office., 2015. "Global employment trends for youth 2015 : scaling up investments in decent jobs for youth," Global Employment Trends Reports 994891803402676, International Labour Office, Economic and Labour Market Analysis Department.
    2. Ravi Balakrishnan & Mai Dao & Juan Sole & Jeremy Zook, 2015. "Recent U.S. Labor Force Dynamics; Reversible or not?," IMF Working Papers 15/76, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Canyon Bosler & Mary C. Daly & John G. Fernald & Bart Hobijn, 2017. "The Outlook for U.S. Labor-Quality Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Education, Skills, and Technical Change: Implications for Future U.S. GDP Growth, pages 61-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  6. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Julia Dennett, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2013. "Does High Home-Ownership Impair the Labor Market?," IZA Discussion Papers 7640, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Serena Rhee & Fatih Karahan, 2015. "Population Aging, Migration Spillovers and the Decline in Interstate Migration," 2015 Meeting Papers 1177, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Foote, Andrew, 2016. "The effects of negative house price changes on migration: Evidence across U.S. housing downturns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 292-299.
    4. Siddharth Kothari & Itay Saporta Eksten & Edison Yu, 2013. "The (Un)importance of Geographical Mobility in the Great Recession"," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 553-563, July.
    5. Demyanyk, Yuliya & Hryshko, Dmytro & Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose & Sorensen, Bent E., 2016. "Moving to a new job: the role of home equity, debt, and access to credit," Working Papers 16-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. Peter A. Diamond, 2013. "Cyclical unemployment, structural unemployment," Working Papers 13-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    7. Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko & Joseph Tracy, 2011. "Housing busts and household mobility: an update," Staff Reports 526, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    8. Henry S. Farber, 2012. "Unemployment in the Great Recession: Did the Housing Market Crisis Prevent the Unemployed from Moving to Take Jobs?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 520-525, May.
    9. Bloze, Gintautas & Skak, Morten, 2016. "Housing equity, residential mobility and commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 156-165.
    10. Meekes, Jordy & Hassink, Wolter, 2017. "The Role of the Housing Market in Workers' Resilience to Job Displacement after Firm Bankruptcy," IZA Discussion Papers 10894, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Davis, Morris A. & Fisher, Jonas D. M. & Veracierto, Marcelo, 2013. "Gross Migration, Housing and Urban Population Dynamics," Working Paper Series WP-2013-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    12. Rebbeca Tesfai, 2017. "Continued Success or Caught in the Housing Bubble? Black Immigrants and the Housing Market Crash," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(4), pages 531-560, August.
    13. Morescalchi, Andrea, 2014. "The puzzle of job search and housing tenure. A reconciliation of theory and empirical evidence," MPRA Paper 59079, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Gaetano Basso & Francesco D'Amuri & Giovanni Peri, 2018. "Immigrants, Labor Market Dynamics and Adjustment to Shocks in the Euro Area," NBER Working Papers 25091, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Bricker, Jesse & Bucks, Brian, 2016. "Negative home equity, economic insecurity, and household mobility over the Great Recession," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-12.
    16. Jennifer Brown & David A. Matsa, 2016. "Locked in by Leverage: Job Search during the Housing Crisis," NBER Working Papers 22929, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Sander van Veldhuizen & Bart Voogt & Benedikt Vogt & Andrea Morescalchi, 2017. "Negative home equity and job mobility," CPB Discussion Paper 345, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    18. Alm, James & Enami, Ali, 2017. "Do government subsidies to low-income individuals affect interstate migration? Evidence from the Massachusetts Health Care Reform," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 119-131.
    19. Valletta, Robert G., 2010. "House Lock and Structural Unemployment," Working Paper Series 2012-25, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, revised 02 Apr 2013.
    20. Brian K. Bucks & Jesse Bricker, 2013. "Household mobility over the Great Recession: evidence from the U.S. 2007-09 Survey of Consumer Finances panel," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-53, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    21. Christopher F. Goetz, 2013. "Falling House Prices And Labor Mobility: Evidence From Matched Employer-Employee Data," Working Papers 13-43, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    22. William T. Dickens & Robert K. Triest, 2012. "Potential effects of the Great Recession on the U.S. labor market," Working Papers 12-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    23. Meekes, Jordy & Hassink, Wolter H.J., 2019. "The role of the housing market in workers′ resilience to job displacement after firm bankruptcy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 41-65.
    24. Samuel M. Otterstrom, 2015. "Income Migration and Home Price Trajectories in the United States," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(2), pages 277-302.
    25. Hugo Erken & Eric van Loon & Wouter Verbeek, 2015. "Mismatch on the Dutch labour market in the Great Recession," CPB Discussion Paper 303, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

  7. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2010. "Mismatch in the labor market: measuring the supply of and demand for skilled labor in New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 10-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Dennett, Julia & Modestino, Alicia Sasser, 2013. "Uncertain futures?: youth attachment to the labor market in the United States and New England," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 13-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

  8. Alicia Sasser, 2009. "Voting with their feet?: local economic conditions and migration patterns in New England," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 09-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Thompson, 2011. "The Impact of Taxes on Migration in New England," Published Studies migration_peri_april13, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. Conway, Karen Smith & Rork, Jonathan C., 2012. "No Country for Old Men (Or Women) — Do State Tax Policies Drive Away the Elderly?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(2), pages 313-356, June.

  9. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 08-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Allen R. Sanderson & John J. Siegfried, 2018. "The National Collegiate Athletic Association Cartel: Why it Exists, How it Works, and What it Does," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 52(2), pages 185-209, March.
    2. Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2012. "Migration, housing market, and labor market responses to employment shocks," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 267-284.

  10. Genia Long & David Cutler & Ernst R. Berndt & Jimmy Royer & Andrée-Anne Fournier & Alicia Sasser & Pierre Cremieux, 2006. "The Impact of Antihypertensive Drugs on the Number and Risk of Death, Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in the United States," NBER Working Papers 12096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Martha J. Bailey & Andrew Goodman-Bacon, 2014. "The War on Poverty's Experiment in Public Medicine: Community Health Centers and the Mortality of Older Americans," NBER Working Papers 20653, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  11. Alicia Sasser & Bo Zhao & Darcy Rollins & Robert Tannenwald, 2006. "The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Chiumenti, Nicholas, 2019. "The growing shortage of affordable housing for the extremely low income in Massachusetts," New England Public Policy Center Policy Reports 19-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Julia Dennett, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    3. Sasser, Alicia C., 2010. "Voting with their feet: Relative economic conditions and state migration patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2-3), pages 122-135, May.
    4. Rob Krueger & David Gibbs, 2008. "'Third Wave' Sustainability? Smart Growth and Regional Development in the USA," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(9), pages 1263-1274.

Articles

  1. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 333-347.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "Retaining recent college graduates in New England: an update on current trends," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Clifford, Robert, 2016. "Student-loan debt, delinquency, and default: a New England perspective," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 16-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Watson, Tara, 2013. "Immigrants as a potential source of growth for New England’s highly skilled workforce," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

  3. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Dennett, Julia, 2013. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses? The impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 322-337.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Sasser, Alicia C., 2010. "Voting with their feet: Relative economic conditions and state migration patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2-3), pages 122-135, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Enríquez Sierra, Hernán & Campo Robledo, Jacobo, 2012. "Equilibrio regional y patrones de migración para el continente americano 1960 - 2005: Análisis espacial por panel de datos
      [Regional equilibrium and migration patterns in the Americas 1960 - 2005:
      ," MPRA Paper 43433, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.
    2. Fredrik Carlsen & Kare Johansen & Lasse Sigbjorn Stambol, 2011. "Effects of Regional Labour Markets on Migration Flows, by Education Level," ERSA conference papers ersa10p693, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Ritashree Chakrabarti & Junfu Zhang, 2015. "Unaffordable housing and local employment growth: Evidence from California municipalities," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 52(6), pages 1134-1151, May.
    4. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Julia Dennett, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Sauro Mocetti & Carmine Porello, 2010. "How does immigration affect native internal mobility? New evidence from Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 748, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Hernán Enríquez Sierra & Carlos Barreto Nieto & Carolina Correa Caro & Jacobo Campo Robledo, 2013. "Precio del suelo y regalías en Colombia: un análisis espacial para los municipios productores de petróleo," Revista Desarrollo y Sociedad, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE, June.
    7. Chakrabarti, Ritashree & Zhang, Junfu, 2014. "Unaffordable Housing and Local Employment Growth: Evidence from California Municipalities," IZA Discussion Papers 8122, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Fu, Yuming & Gabriel, Stuart A., 2012. "Labor migration, human capital agglomeration and regional development in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 473-484.
    9. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S. & Olfert, M. Rose & Ali, Kamar, 2012. "Dwindling U.S. internal migration: Evidence of spatial equilibrium or structural shifts in local labor markets?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 375-388.
    10. Alm, James & Enami, Ali, 2017. "Do government subsidies to low-income individuals affect interstate migration? Evidence from the Massachusetts Health Care Reform," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 119-131.
    11. Ritashree Chakrabarti & Junfu Zhang, 2010. "Unaffordable housing and local employment growth," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 10-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    12. Hawley, Zackary B. & Rork, Jonathan C., 2013. "The case of state funded higher education scholarship plans and interstate brain drain," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 242-249.
    13. Alessandro Innocenti & Francesca Lorini & Chiara Rapallini, 2014. "Ethnic Heterogeneity, Voting Partecipation and Local Economic Growth. The Case of Belgium," Working Papers - Economics wp2014_03.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    14. Hernán Enríquez Sierra & Jacobo Campo Robledo, 2013. "Regional equilibrium and migration patterns in the Americas 1960-2005: Spatial data panel analysis," Working Papers 010478, Universidad Sergio Arboleda.

  5. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of skilled labor: New England’s supply of recent college graduates," New England Economic Indicators, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Dec, pages 2-7.

    Cited by:

    1. Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2012. "Migration, housing market, and labor market responses to employment shocks," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 267-284.

  6. Alicia Sasser, 2008. "The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates," Annual Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, pages 4-23. See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Alicia C. Sasser, 2005. "Gender Differences in Physician Pay: Tradeoffs Between Career and Family," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).

    Cited by:

    1. Francesconi, Marco & Parey, Matthias, 2018. "Early Gender Gaps among University Graduates," IZA Discussion Papers 11361, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Alicia Sasser Modestino, 2013. "The impact of managed care on the gender earnings gap among physicians," Working Papers 13-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    3. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 2016. "A Most Egalitarian Profession: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(3), pages 705-746.
    4. Hardoy, Inés & Schøne, Pål & Østbakken, Kjersti Misje, 2017. "Children and the gender gap in management," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 124-137.
    5. Adnan, Wifag & Miaari, Sami H., 2018. "Voting Patterns and the Gender Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 11261, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Stefanie Schurer & Daniel Kuehnle & Anthony Scott & Terence C. Cheng, 2016. "A Man's Blessing or a Woman's Curse? The Family Earnings Gap of Doctors," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 385-414, July.
    7. Marianne Bertrand & Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 2009. "Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Corporate and Financial Sectors," NBER Working Papers 14681, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Cheng, T. C. & Trivedi, P. K., 2014. "Attrition Bias in Panel Data: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing? A Case Study Based on the MABEL Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Gravelle, Hugh & Hole, Arne Risa & Santos, Rita, 2011. "Measuring and testing for gender discrimination in physician pay: English family doctors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 660-674, July.
    10. Claudia Goldin, 2014. "A Grand Gender Convergence: Its Last Chapter," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(4), pages 1091-1119, April.
    11. Kamas, Linda & Preston, Anne, 2018. "Competing with confidence: The ticket to labor market success for college-educated women," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 231-252.
    12. Qin, Xuezheng & Li, Lixing & Hsieh, Chee-Ruey, 2013. "Too few doctors or too low wages? Labor supply of health care professionals in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 150-164.
    13. Gicheva, Dora & Mikkelsen, Ian, 2019. "Family-Oriented Job Benefits and the Returns to Graduate Education," UNCG Economics Working Papers 19-4, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    14. Marianne Bertrand & Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 2010. "Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Financial and Corporate Sectors," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 228-255, July.
    15. Ralsmark, Hilda, 2017. "Education, norms, and gender equality," Working Papers in Economics 702, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    16. Wang, Chao & Sweetman, Arthur, 2013. "Gender, family status and physician labour supply," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 17-25.
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    21. M. Keith Chen & Judith A. Chevalier, 2012. "Are Women Overinvesting in Education? Evidence from the Medical Profession," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(2), pages 124-149.
    22. Nayoung Rim & Kyung Park, 2017. "The Gendered Effects of Career Concerns on Fertility," Departmental Working Papers 59, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2006-03-18 2008-10-07 2012-05-02 2013-03-23
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2006-07-09 2009-07-28 2012-05-02 2015-05-09
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2006-04-01 2007-11-24 2013-03-23
  4. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2008-10-07 2015-09-05
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2016-09-11 2016-10-02
  6. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2009-07-28 2012-05-02
  7. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-03-23
  8. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2006-07-09
  9. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2007-11-24
  10. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2006-04-01
  11. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2013-03-23
  12. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2009-07-28
  13. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (1) 2016-10-02

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