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The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?

Author

Listed:
  • Alicia Sasser
  • Bo Zhao
  • Darcy Rollins
  • Robert Tannenwald

Abstract

Although housing costs in greater Boston and elsewhere around the region have leveled off, affordable housing is still high on the public policy agenda in every New England state. A growing chorus of employers and policymakers are warning that the region's high cost of housing is now undermining its ability to attract and retain workers and businesses. This paper presents a thorough, region-wide analysis of the housing affordability problem in New England. We construct three affordability indicators to examine differences in the cost of housing across socioeconomic, demographic, and occupational groups, for every New England state and for the region's principal metropolitan areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Alicia Sasser & Bo Zhao & Darcy Rollins & Robert Tannenwald, 2006. "The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbcw:06-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Julia Dennett, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Rob Krueger & David Gibbs, 2008. "'Third Wave' Sustainability? Smart Growth and Regional Development in the USA," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(9), pages 1263-1274.
    3. Sasser, Alicia C., 2010. "Voting with their feet: Relative economic conditions and state migration patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2-3), pages 122-135, May.

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    Keywords

    Housing - New England ; Housing - Prices ; Housing policy - New England;

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