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The growing shortage of affordable housing for the extremely low income in Massachusetts

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  • Nicholas Chiumenti

Abstract

This report identifies ways that the state?s policymakers and housing agencies and providers can more efficiently use limited resources to address the affordable housing needs of extremely low-income households. The first is to prioritize rental assistance in areas of the state where rents are low and the inventory of market-supplied housing is high. Doing so will take advantage of local market conditions that are favorable to rental-assistance subsidies while addressing these areas? high rates of rent burden. Tax-credit and other supply-oriented subsidies can be targeted more heavily to areas with less affordable housing stock overall. Building geographic considerations into program administration can help achieve this tailoring of resources. Second, preserving expiring subsidies in smaller cities and towns will ensure broader access to affordable housing throughout Massachusetts. The state?s increasing need to preserve affordable housing is widely acknowledged and supported. Many of these units are located in major cities and metro areas; however, smaller cities and towns, while accounting for a smaller share of the subsidized housing, are at risk of seeing most or all of their subsidized units expire by 2025.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Chiumenti, 2019. "The growing shortage of affordable housing for the extremely low income in Massachusetts," New England Public Policy Center Policy Reports 19-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbpr:2019_001
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    File URL: https://www.bostonfed.org/publications/new-england-public-policy-center-policy-report/2019/growing-shortage-affordable-housing-extremely-low-income-massachusetts.aspx
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    File URL: https://www.bostonfed.org/-/media/Documents/Workingpapers/PDF/2019/neppcpr1901.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dirk W. Early, 1998. "The role of subsidized housing in reducing homelessness: An empirical investigation using micro-data," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 687-696.
    2. Corinth, Kevin, 2017. "The impact of permanent supportive housing on homeless populations," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 69-84.
    3. Robert Collinson & Ingrid Gould Ellen & Jens Ludwig, 2015. "Low-Income Housing Policy," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume 2, pages 59-126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Darcy Rollins & Alicia Sasser & Robert Tannenwald & Bo Zhao, 2006. "The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?," New England Public Policy Center Working Paper 06-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Robert Clifford & Osborne Jackson, 2015. "Can subsidized housing help address homelessness in New England?," New England Public Policy Center Research Report 15-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. Sandra J. Newman & Joseph M. Harkness, 2002. "The long-term effects of public housing on self-sufficiency," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 21-43.
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    Keywords

    Massachusetts; low-income households; NEPPC;

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