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Emmanuel Kemel

Personal Details

First Name:Emmanuel
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kemel
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pke314
http://sites.google.com/site/researchemmanuelkemel/

Affiliation

Départment de Finance et Économie
HEC Paris (École des Hautes Études Commerciales)

Jouy-en-Josas, France
http://www.hec.edu/Faculty-and-Research/Finance/

:

78351 Jouy-en-Josas cedex
RePEc:edi:dfhecfr (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Mohammed Abdellaoui & Emmanuel Kemel, 2013. "Eliciting Prospect Theory When Consequences Are Measured in Time Units: "Time Is Not Money"," Post-Print hal-01069187, HAL.

Articles

  1. Emmanuel Kemel & Muriel Travers, 2016. "Comparing attitudes toward time and toward money in experience-based decisions," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 71-100, January.
  2. Mohammed Abdellaoui & Emmanuel Kemel, 2014. "Eliciting Prospect Theory When Consequences Are Measured in Time Units: “Time Is Not Money”," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 60(7), pages 1844-1859, July.
  3. Kemel, Emmanuel & Paraschiv, Corina, 2013. "Prospect Theory for joint time and money consequences in risk and ambiguity," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 81-95.
  4. Laurent Carnis & Emmanuel Kemel, 2012. "Assessing the Role of Context in Traffic Light Violations," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3386-3393.
  5. Emmanuel Kemel & Roger Collet & Laurent Hivert, 2011. "Evidence for an endogenous rebound effect impacting long-run car use elasticity to fuel price," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(4), pages 2777-2786.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Mohammed Abdellaoui & Emmanuel Kemel, 2013. "Eliciting Prospect Theory When Consequences Are Measured in Time Units: "Time Is Not Money"," Post-Print hal-01069187, HAL.

    Cited by:

    1. Shuli Liu & Xinwang Liu, 2016. "A Sample Survey Based Linguistic MADM Method with Prospect Theory for Online Shopping Problems," Group Decision and Negotiation, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 749-774, July.
    2. Doll, Monika & Seebauer, Michael & Tonn, Maren, 2017. "Bargaining over waiting time in gain and loss framed ultimatum games," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 15/2017, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    3. Emmanuel Kemel & Muriel Travers, 2016. "Comparing attitudes toward time and toward money in experience-based decisions," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 71-100, January.
    4. Christoph Merkle & Philipp Schreiber & Martin Weber, 2017. "Framing and retirement age: The gap between willingness-to-accept and willingness-to-pay," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 32(92), pages 757-809.
    5. Emmanuel Kemel & Corina Paraschiv, 2018. "Deciding about human lives: an experimental measure of risk attitudes under prospect theory," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 51(1), pages 163-192, June.
    6. Krawczyk, Michał Wiktor, 2015. "Probability weighting in different domains: The role of affect, fungibility, and stakes," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1-15.
    7. Müller, Julia & Li, Zhihua & Wakker, Peter P. & Wang, Tong V., 2016. "The Rich Domain of Ambiguity Explored," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145734, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    8. Michał Krawczyk, 2014. "Probability weighting in different domains: the role of stakes, fungibility, and affect," Working Papers 2014-15, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    9. James C. Cox & Eike B. Kroll & Marcel Lichters & Vjollca Sadiraj & Bodo Vogt, 2018. "The St. Petersburg Paradox Despite Risk-seeking Preferences: An Experimental Study," Experimental Economics Center Working Paper Series 2018-02, Experimental Economics Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    10. Briony D. Pulford & Andrew M. Colman & Graham Loomes, 2018. "Incentive Magnitude Effects in Experimental Games: Bigger is not Necessarily Better," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-10, January.

Articles

  1. Emmanuel Kemel & Muriel Travers, 2016. "Comparing attitudes toward time and toward money in experience-based decisions," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 71-100, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Müller, Julia & Li, Zhihua & Wakker, Peter P. & Wang, Tong V., 2016. "The Rich Domain of Ambiguity Explored," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145734, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Briony D. Pulford & Andrew M. Colman & Graham Loomes, 2018. "Incentive Magnitude Effects in Experimental Games: Bigger is not Necessarily Better," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-10, January.

  2. Mohammed Abdellaoui & Emmanuel Kemel, 2014. "Eliciting Prospect Theory When Consequences Are Measured in Time Units: “Time Is Not Money”," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 60(7), pages 1844-1859, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Kemel, Emmanuel & Paraschiv, Corina, 2013. "Prospect Theory for joint time and money consequences in risk and ambiguity," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 81-95.

    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Kemel & Muriel Travers, 2016. "Comparing attitudes toward time and toward money in experience-based decisions," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 71-100, January.
    2. Li, Xue-yan & Li, Xue-mei & Yang, Lingrun & Li, Jing, 2018. "Dynamic route and departure time choice model based on self-adaptive reference point and reinforcement learning," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 502(C), pages 77-92.
    3. Müller, Julia & Li, Zhihua & Wakker, Peter P. & Wang, Tong V., 2016. "The Rich Domain of Ambiguity Explored," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145734, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Li, Baibing & Hensher, David A., 2017. "Risky weighting in discrete choice," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 1-21.
    5. Li, Xue-yan & Li, Xue-mei & Li, Xue-wei & Qiu, He-ting, 2017. "Multi-agent fare optimization model of two modes problem and its analysis based on edge of chaos," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 469(C), pages 405-419.

  4. Emmanuel Kemel & Roger Collet & Laurent Hivert, 2011. "Evidence for an endogenous rebound effect impacting long-run car use elasticity to fuel price," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(4), pages 2777-2786.

    Cited by:

    1. Roger Collet & Laurent Hivert & Jean-Loup Madre, 2012. "Diffusion de l’automobile en France : vers quels plafonds pour la motorisation et l’usage ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 457(1), pages 123-139.

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