IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/psp38.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Leonidas Spiliopoulos

Personal Details

First Name:Leonidas
Middle Name:
Last Name:Spiliopoulos
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psp38
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/dr-leonidas-spiliopoulos

Affiliation

School of Economics
UNSW Business School
UNSW (Australia)

Sydney, Australia
http://www.economics.unsw.edu.au/

: (+61)-2-9385-3380
+61)-2- 9313- 6337
Australian School of Business Building, Sydney 2052
RePEc:edi:senswau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Andreas Ortmann & Leonidas Spiliopoulos, 2015. "The beauty of simplicity? (Simple) heuristics and the opportunities yet to be realized," Discussion Papers 2015-25, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  2. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2010. "The determinants of macroeconomic volatility: A Bayesian model averaging approach," MPRA Paper 26832, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2009. "Neural networks as a learning paradigm for general normal form games," MPRA Paper 16765, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Leonidas, Spiliopoulos, 2009. "Learning backward induction: a neural network agent approach," MPRA Paper 17267, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2008. "Humans versus computer algorithms in repeated mixed strategy games," MPRA Paper 6672, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2008. "Do repeated game players detect patterns in opponents? Revisiting the Nyarko & Schotter belief elicitation experiment," MPRA Paper 6666, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Leonidas Spiliopoulos, 2005. "What determines macroeconomic volatility? A cross-section and panel data study," Macroeconomics 0505026, EconWPA.
  8. Leonidas Spiliopoulos, 2005. "Can the human mind learn to backward induce? A neural network answer," Game Theory and Information 0505008, EconWPA.

Articles

  1. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2013. "Beyond fictitious play beliefs: Incorporating pattern recognition and similarity matching," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 69-85.
  2. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2012. "Interactive learning in 2×2 normal form games by neural network agents," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(22), pages 5557-5562.
  3. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2012. "Pattern recognition and subjective belief learning in a repeated constant-sum game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 921-935.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2010. "The determinants of macroeconomic volatility: A Bayesian model averaging approach," MPRA Paper 26832, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Davide fiaschi & Lisa Gianmoena & Angela Parenti, 2013. "The Determinants of Growth Rate Volatility in European Regions," Discussion Papers 2013/170, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

  2. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2008. "Humans versus computer algorithms in repeated mixed strategy games," MPRA Paper 6672, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Jason Shachat & J. Todd Swarthout, 2002. "Learning about Learning in Games through Experimental Control of Strategic Interdependence," Experimental Economics Center Working Paper Series 2006-17, Experimental Economics Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, revised Aug 2008.
    2. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2008. "Do repeated game players detect patterns in opponents? Revisiting the Nyarko & Schotter belief elicitation experiment," MPRA Paper 6666, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Jason Shachat & J. Todd Swarthout & Lijia Wei, 2011. "Man versus Nash An experiment on the self-enforcing nature of mixed strategy equilibrium," Working Papers 1101, Xiamen Unversity, The Wang Yanan Institute for Studies in Economics, Finance and Economics Experimental Laboratory, revised 21 Feb 2011.

  3. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2008. "Do repeated game players detect patterns in opponents? Revisiting the Nyarko & Schotter belief elicitation experiment," MPRA Paper 6666, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Steven D. Levitt & John A. List & David H. Reiley, Jr., 2009. "What Happens in the Field Stays in the Field: Exploring Whether Professionals Play Minimax in Laboratory Experiments," NBER Working Papers 15609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kenneth Kovash & Steven D. Levitt, 2009. "Professionals Do Not Play Minimax: Evidence from Major League Baseball and the National Football League," NBER Working Papers 15347, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2008. "Humans versus computer algorithms in repeated mixed strategy games," MPRA Paper 6672, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Steven Levitt & John List & David Reiley, 2010. "What happens in the field stays in the field: Professionals do not play minimax in laboratory experiments," Artefactual Field Experiments 00080, The Field Experiments Website.

  4. Leonidas Spiliopoulos, 2005. "What determines macroeconomic volatility? A cross-section and panel data study," Macroeconomics 0505026, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Pamela Góngora Salazar, 2010. "Determinantes de la volatilidad en el producto: evidencia empírica," VNIVERSITAS ECONÓMICA 008297, UNIVERSIDAD JAVERIANA - BOGOTÁ.
    2. Ghulam Mohey-ud-din & Muhammad Wasif Siddiqi, 2016. "Determinants of GDP Fluctuations in Selected South Asian Countries: A Macro-Panel Study," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 55(4), pages 483-497.
    3. Vatcharin Sirimaneetham, 2006. "Explaining policy volatility in developing countries," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 06/583, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

Articles

  1. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2013. "Beyond fictitious play beliefs: Incorporating pattern recognition and similarity matching," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 69-85.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Ortmann & Leonidas Spiliopoulos, 2017. "The beauty of simplicity? (Simple) heuristics and the opportunities yet to be realized," Chapters,in: Handbook of Behavioural Economics and Smart Decision-Making, chapter 7, pages 119-136 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Eric Guerci & Nobuyuki Hanaki & Naoki Watanabe, 2015. "Meaningful Learning in Weighted Voting Games: An Experiment," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-40, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    3. Ioannou, Christos A. & Romero, Julian, 2014. "A generalized approach to belief learning in repeated games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 178-203.

  2. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2012. "Pattern recognition and subjective belief learning in a repeated constant-sum game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 921-935.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Ortmann & Leonidas Spiliopoulos, 2017. "The beauty of simplicity? (Simple) heuristics and the opportunities yet to be realized," Chapters,in: Handbook of Behavioural Economics and Smart Decision-Making, chapter 7, pages 119-136 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Eric Guerci & Nobuyuki Hanaki & Naoki Watanabe, 2015. "Meaningful Learning in Weighted Voting Games: An Experiment," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-40, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    3. Duffy, Sean & Naddeo, JJ & Owens, David & Smith, John, 2016. "Cognitive load and mixed strategies: On brains and minimax," MPRA Paper 71878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Nobuyuki Hanaki & Alan Kirman & Paul Pezanis-Christou, 2018. "Observational and reinforcement pattern-learning: An exploratory study ," Post-Print halshs-01723513, HAL.
    5. Emara, Noha & Owens, David & Smith, John & Wilmer, Lisa, 2014. "Serial correlation in National Football League play calling and its effects on outcomes," MPRA Paper 67862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ioannou, Christos A. & Romero, Julian, 2014. "A generalized approach to belief learning in repeated games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 178-203.
    7. Nobuyuki Hanaki & Alan Kirman & Paul Pezanis-Christou, 2016. "Counter intuitive learning: An exploratory study," Working Papers hal-01358716, HAL.
    8. Arifovic, J. & Hommes, C.H. & Salle, I., 2016. "Learning to believe in Simple Equilibria in a Complex OLG Economy - evidence from the lab," CeNDEF Working Papers 16-06, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    9. Nobuyuki Hanaki & Alan Kirman & Paul Pezanis-Christou, 2016. "Observational and Reinforcement Pattern-learning: An Exploratory Study," GREDEG Working Papers 2016-24, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, revised Jun 2017.
    10. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2013. "Beyond fictitious play beliefs: Incorporating pattern recognition and similarity matching," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 69-85.
    11. Emara, Noha & Owens, David & Smith, John & Wilmer, Lisa, 2014. "Minimax on the gridiron: Serial correlation and its effects on outcomes in the National Football League," MPRA Paper 58907, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (6) 2005-06-05 2008-01-12 2008-01-19 2009-08-16 2009-09-19 2015-11-21. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (5) 2008-01-12 2008-01-19 2009-08-16 2009-09-19 2015-11-21. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (4) 2008-01-12 2008-01-19 2009-08-16 2009-09-19
  4. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (4) 2008-01-12 2008-01-19 2009-08-16 2009-09-19
  5. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (4) 2008-01-12 2008-01-19 2009-08-16 2009-09-19
  6. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (2) 2009-09-19 2015-11-21
  7. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2010-11-27
  8. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2005-06-05
  9. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2009-08-16

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Leonidas Spiliopoulos should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.