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Stephen Coleman

Personal Details

First Name:Stephen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Coleman
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco27
http://www.populardelusions.org

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Coleman, Stephen, 2014. "Evolution of the Russian Political Party System under the Influence of Social Conformity: 1993-2011," MPRA Paper 59038, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Coleman, Stephen, 2012. "Diffusion and Spatial Equilibrium of a Social Norm: Voting Participation in the United States, 1920-2008," MPRA Paper 43509, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Coleman, Stephen, 2010. "The spatial diffusion of social conformity: the case of voting participation," MPRA Paper 23057, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Coleman, Stephen, 2009. "Russian Election Reform and the Effect of Social Conformity on Voting and the Party System: 2007 and 2008," MPRA Paper 13087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Coleman, Stephen, 2007. "The Minnesota Income Tax Compliance Experiment: Replication of the Social Norms Experiment," MPRA Paper 5820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Coleman, Stephen, 1996. "The Minnesota income tax compliance experiment: State tax results," MPRA Paper 4827, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Stephen Coleman, 2014. "Diffusion and spatial equilibrium of a social norm: voting participation in the United States, 1920–2008," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1769-1783, May.
  2. Coleman, S., 2010. "Russian Election Reform and the Effect of Social Conformity on Voting and the Party System: 2007 and 2008," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, issue 5, pages 73-90.
  3. Coleman, Stephen, 2004. "The Effect of Social Conformity on Collective Voting Behavior," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(01), pages 76-96, December.
  4. Stephen Coleman, 1995. "Dynamics in the fragmentation of political party systems," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 141-155, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Coleman, Stephen, 1996. "The Minnesota income tax compliance experiment: State tax results," MPRA Paper 4827, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Who cares if you don’t pay your taxes?
      by Guest blogger in Eval Central on 2013-12-19 17:30:08
  2. Coleman, Stephen, 2007. "The Minnesota Income Tax Compliance Experiment: Replication of the Social Norms Experiment," MPRA Paper 5820, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Who cares if you don’t pay your taxes?
      by Guest blogger in Eval Central on 2013-12-19 17:30:08

Working papers

  1. Coleman, Stephen, 2007. "The Minnesota Income Tax Compliance Experiment: Replication of the Social Norms Experiment," MPRA Paper 5820, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Lucio Castro & Carlos Scartascini, 2013. "Tax Compliance and Enforcement in the Pampas: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-472, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Daniel Ortega & Carlos Scartascini, 2015. "Don't Blame the Messenger: A Field Experiment on Delivery Methods for Increasing Tax Compliance," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7284, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Peter John & Jane Robb, 2017. "Using behavioural insights for citizen compliance and cooperation," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2017(1), pages 1-1, March.
    4. Biddle, Nicholas & Fels, Katja & Sinning, Mathias, 2017. "Behavioral Insights and Business Taxation: Evidence from Two Randomized Controlled Trials," IZA Discussion Papers 10795, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Kristina M. Bott & Alexander Cappelen & Erik Ø. Sørensen & Bertil Tungodden, 2017. "You've Got Mail: A Randomised Field Experiment on Tax Evasion," Working Papers 2017-051, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    6. Jon Elster, 2017. "On seeing and being seen," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(3), pages 721-734, December.

  2. Coleman, Stephen, 1996. "The Minnesota income tax compliance experiment: State tax results," MPRA Paper 4827, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Kjetil Telle, 2012. "Monitoring and enforcement of environmental regulations. Lessons from a natural field experiment in Norway," Discussion Papers 680, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Lucio Castro & Carlos Scartascini, 2013. "Tax Compliance and Enforcement in the Pampas: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-472, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Engström, Per & Hesselius, Patrik, 2007. "The information method - theory and application," Working Paper Series 2007:17, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    4. Hallsworth, Michael & List, John A. & Metcalfe, Robert D. & Vlaev, Ivo, 2017. "The behavioralist as tax collector: Using natural field experiments to enhance tax compliance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 14-31.
    5. Kogler, Christoph & Batrancea, Larissa & Nichita, Anca & Pantya, Jozsef & Belianin, Alexis & Kirchler, Erich, 2013. "Trust and power as determinants of tax compliance: Testing the assumptions of the slippery slope framework in Austria, Hungary, Romania and Russia," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 169-180.
    6. Daniel Ortega & Carlos Scartascini, 2015. "Don't Blame the Messenger: A Field Experiment on Delivery Methods for Increasing Tax Compliance," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7284, Inter-American Development Bank.
    7. Engström, Per & Hesselius, Patrik & Persson, Malin, 2007. "Excess use of Temporary Parental Benefit," Working Paper Series 2007:18, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. Peter John & Jane Robb, 2017. "Using behavioural insights for citizen compliance and cooperation," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2017(1), pages 1-1, March.
    9. Gonzalez, Fidel & Leipnik, Mark & Mazumder, Diya, 2013. "How much are urban residents in Mexico willing to pay for cleaner air?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(03), pages 354-379, June.
    10. Telle, Kjetil, 2013. "Monitoring and enforcement of environmental regulations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 24-34.
    11. Kristina M. Bott & Alexander Cappelen & Erik Ø. Sørensen & Bertil Tungodden, 2017. "You've Got Mail: A Randomised Field Experiment on Tax Evasion," Working Papers 2017-051, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    12. Kettle,Stewart & Hernandez,Marco & Ruda,Simon & Sanders,Michael, 2016. "Behavioral interventions in tax compliance : evidence from Guatemala," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7690, The World Bank.
    13. Wenzel, Michael, 2005. "Misperceptions of social norms about tax compliance: From theory to intervention," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 862-883, December.
    14. Coleman, Stephen, 2007. "The Minnesota Income Tax Compliance Experiment: Replication of the Social Norms Experiment," MPRA Paper 5820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Jon Elster, 2017. "On seeing and being seen," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(3), pages 721-734, December.

Articles

  1. Coleman, Stephen, 2004. "The Effect of Social Conformity on Collective Voting Behavior," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(01), pages 76-96, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Bernado Moreno & María del Pino Ramos-Sosa & Ismael Rodríguez-Lara, 2016. "Conformity, information and truthful voting," Working Papers 2016-01, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.
    2. Coleman, Stephen, 2009. "Russian Election Reform and the Effect of Social Conformity on Voting and the Party System: 2007 and 2008," MPRA Paper 13087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Elena Panova, 2011. "A Passion for Democracy," CIRANO Working Papers 2011s-47, CIRANO.
    4. Panova, Elena, 2015. "A passion for voting," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 44-65.
    5. Landi, M. & Sodini, M., 2012. "An evolutionary analysis of turnout with conformist citizens," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1431-1447.
    6. Grajzl, Peter & Baniak, Andrzej, 2012. "Mandating behavioral conformity in social groups with conformist members," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 479-493.
    7. Coleman, Stephen, 2010. "The spatial diffusion of social conformity: the case of voting participation," MPRA Paper 23057, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Coleman, Stephen, 2014. "Evolution of the Russian Political Party System under the Influence of Social Conformity: 1993-2011," MPRA Paper 59038, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Coleman, Stephen, 2012. "Diffusion and Spatial Equilibrium of a Social Norm: Voting Participation in the United States, 1920-2008," MPRA Paper 43509, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Stephen Coleman, 1995. "Dynamics in the fragmentation of political party systems," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 141-155, May.

    Cited by:

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (4) 2009-02-07 2010-06-11 2013-01-12 2014-11-22
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (4) 2009-02-07 2010-06-11 2013-01-12 2014-11-22
  3. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (3) 2007-11-24 2010-06-11 2013-01-12
  4. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (3) 2009-02-07 2010-06-11 2014-11-22
  5. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (2) 2010-06-11 2014-11-22
  6. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2010-06-11 2013-01-12
  7. NEP-ACC: Accounting & Auditing (1) 2007-11-24
  8. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2007-11-24
  9. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2007-11-24
  10. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2007-11-24

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