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Gregory S. Burge

Personal Details

First Name:Gregory
Middle Name:S.
Last Name:Burge
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbu101
http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/B/Gregory.S.Burge-1/
Terminal Degree:2005 Department of Economics; Florida State University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Oklahoma

Norman, Oklahoma (United States)
https://www.ou.edu/cas/economics




RePEc:edi:decouus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Burge, Gregory, 2014. "The capitalization effects of school, residential, and commercial impact fees on undeveloped land values," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-13.
  2. Gregory S. Burge & Trey L. Trosper & Arthur C. Nelson & Julian C. Juergensmeyer & James C. Nicholas, 2013. "Can Development Impact Fees Help Mitigate Urban Sprawl?," Journal of the American Planning Association, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 79(3), pages 235-248, July.
  3. Burge, Gregory S. & Piper, Brian, 2012. "Strategic Fiscal Interdependence: County and Municipal Adoptions of Local Option Sales Taxes," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(2), pages 387-415, June.
  4. Gregory S. Burge, 2011. "Do Tenants Capture the Benefits from the Low‐Income Housing Tax Credit Program?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 71-96, March.
  5. Burge, Gregory & Rogers, Cynthia, 2011. "Local option sales taxes and consumer spending patterns: Fiscal interdependence under multi-tiered local taxation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 46-58, January.
  6. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2009. "Development impact fees and employment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 54-62, January.
  7. Gregory S. Burge & Arthur C. Nelson & John Matthews, 2007. "Effects of proportionate‐share impact fees," Housing Policy Debate, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 679-710, January.
  8. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2006. "Impact fees and single-family home construction," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 284-306, September.
  9. Gregory Burge & Keith Ihlanfeldt, 2006. "The Effects Of Impact Fees On Multifamily Housing Construction," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 5-23, February.
  10. Burge, Gregory S. & Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 2005. "Estimating Aggregate Levels of Property Tax Assessment Within Local Jurisdictions: An Extension of the Ihlanfeldt Model to Multiple Land Uses," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 58(4), pages 723-740, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Burge, Gregory, 2014. "The capitalization effects of school, residential, and commercial impact fees on undeveloped land values," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-13.

    Cited by:

    1. McAllister, Pat & Shepherd, Edward & Wyatt, Peter, 2018. "Policy shifts, developer contributions and land value capture in London 2005–2017," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 316-326.
    2. Cameron K. Murray, 2016. "Developers pay developer charges," Discussion Papers Series 567, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.

  2. Gregory S. Burge & Trey L. Trosper & Arthur C. Nelson & Julian C. Juergensmeyer & James C. Nicholas, 2013. "Can Development Impact Fees Help Mitigate Urban Sprawl?," Journal of the American Planning Association, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 79(3), pages 235-248, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Barbour, Elisa & Chatman, Daniel G. & Doggett, Sarah & Yip, Stella & Santana, Manuel, 2019. "SB 743 Implementation: Challenges and Opportunities," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt4gj3n2n3, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    2. Nae-Young Choei & Hyungkyoo Kim & Seonghun Kim, 2020. "Improving Infrastructure Installation Planning Processes using Procedural Modeling," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-15, February.

  3. Burge, Gregory S. & Piper, Brian, 2012. "Strategic Fiscal Interdependence: County and Municipal Adoptions of Local Option Sales Taxes," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(2), pages 387-415, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Agrawal, David R., 2016. "Local fiscal competition: An application to sales taxation with multiple federations," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 122-138.
    2. Agrawal, David R., 2014. "LOST in America: Evidence on local sales taxes from national panel data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 147-163.
    3. Lang (Kate) Yang & Bradley T. Heim, 2017. "Responsiveness of Income to Local Income Taxes: Evidence from Indiana," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 70(2), pages 367-392, June.
    4. Emefa Sewordor & David L. Sjoquist, 2016. "Lights, Camera, Action: The Adoption of State Film Tax Credits," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 5-25, June.
    5. Whitney B. Afonso, 2017. "State LST Laws: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Laws Governing Local Sales Taxes," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 25-46, December.
    6. Spencer T. Brien & Wenli Yan, 2020. "Are Overlapping Local Governments Competing With Each Other When Issuing Debt?," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 75-92, June.
    7. Hawley, Zackary & Rork, Jonathan C., 2015. "Competition and property tax limit overrides: Revisiting Massachusetts' Proposition 2½," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 93-107.
    8. Melissa Gentry & Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley & Shawn M. Rohlin & Jeffrey P. Thompson, 2020. "Dynamic Sales Tax Competition: Evidence from Panel Data at the Border," Working Papers 20-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    9. David R. Agrawal, 2015. "The Tax Gradient: Spatial Aspects of Fiscal Competition," CESifo Working Paper Series 5292, CESifo.

  4. Gregory S. Burge, 2011. "Do Tenants Capture the Benefits from the Low‐Income Housing Tax Credit Program?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 71-96, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Tuukka Saarimaa & Essi Eerola, 2013. "Is Social Housing Affordable?," ERSA conference papers ersa13p927, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Lang, Bree J., 2015. "Input distortions in the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit: Evidence from building size," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 119-128.
    3. Essi Eerola & Tuukka Saarimaa, 2017. "Delivering Affordable Housing and Neighborhood Quality: A Comparison of Place- and Tenant-Based Programs," CESifo Working Paper Series 6674, CESifo.
    4. Matthew Klesta & Frank Manzo & Francisca Richter & Mark S. Sniderman, 2013. "Low-income-rental-housing programs in the Fourth District," Working Papers (Old Series) 1311, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 2013.
    5. Karima Kourtit & Peter Nijkamp & Roger R. Stough (ed.), 2015. "The Rise of the City," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15798.
    6. Eerola, Essi & Saarimaa, Tuukka, 2015. "Who Benefits from Public Housing?," Working Papers 68, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Freedman, Matthew & Owens, Emily G., 2011. "Low-income housing development and crime," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2-3), pages 115-131, September.
    8. Lang, Bree J., 2012. "Location incentives in the low-income housing tax credit: Are qualified census tracts necessary?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 142-150.
    9. Olsen, Edgar O. & Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2015. "US Housing Policy," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.),Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 887-986, Elsevier.

  5. Burge, Gregory & Rogers, Cynthia, 2011. "Local option sales taxes and consumer spending patterns: Fiscal interdependence under multi-tiered local taxation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 46-58, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Agrawal, David R., 2016. "Local fiscal competition: An application to sales taxation with multiple federations," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 122-138.
    2. Wang, Jia, 2018. "Strategic interaction and economic development incentives policy: Evidence from U.S. States," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 249-259.
    3. Agrawal, David R., 2014. "LOST in America: Evidence on local sales taxes from national panel data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 147-163.
    4. Lang (Kate) Yang & Bradley T. Heim, 2017. "Responsiveness of Income to Local Income Taxes: Evidence from Indiana," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 70(2), pages 367-392, June.
    5. David R. Agrawal & David E. Wildasin, 2019. "Sales Taxation, Spatial Agglomeration, and the Internet," CESifo Working Paper Series 7742, CESifo.
    6. Reingewertz, Yaniv, 2018. "Corporate taxes and vertical tax externalities: Evidence from narrative federal tax shocks," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 84-97.
    7. Spencer T. Brien & Wenli Yan, 2020. "Are Overlapping Local Governments Competing With Each Other When Issuing Debt?," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 75-92, June.
    8. Melissa Gentry & Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley & Shawn M. Rohlin & Jeffrey P. Thompson, 2020. "Dynamic Sales Tax Competition: Evidence from Panel Data at the Border," Working Papers 20-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

  6. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2009. "Development impact fees and employment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 54-62, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Burge, Gregory, 2014. "The capitalization effects of school, residential, and commercial impact fees on undeveloped land values," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-13.
    2. Rohlin, Shawn M. & Thompson, Jeffrey P., 2018. "Local sales taxes, employment, and tax competition," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 373-383.
    3. Gorecki, Paul & Hennessy, Hugh & Lyons, Sean, 2011. "How impact fees and local planning regulation can influence deployment of telecoms infrastructure," 22nd European Regional ITS Conference, Budapest 2011: Innovative ICT Applications - Emerging Regulatory, Economic and Policy Issues 52160, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
    4. Carlianne Patrick, 2014. "Does Increasing Available Non-Tax Economic Development Incentives Result in More Jobs?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 67(2), pages 351-386, June.
    5. Adam Jones, 2015. "Fees and Firms: An Empirical Examination of the Relationship Between Development Impact Fees and Firms," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(2), pages 261-269, June.
    6. Xiaofang Dong & Shihe Fu & Yufei Yuan, 2013. "Impact Fees and Real Estate Prices: Evidence from 35 Chinese Cities," Frontiers of Economics in China, Higher Education Press, vol. 8(2), pages 207-219, June.

  7. Gregory S. Burge & Arthur C. Nelson & John Matthews, 2007. "Effects of proportionate‐share impact fees," Housing Policy Debate, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 679-710, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Jiang, Yong & Swallow, Stephen K., 2017. "Impact Fees Coupled With Conservation Payments to Sustain Ecosystem Structure: A Conceptual and Numerical Application at the Urban-Rural Fringe," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 136-147.
    2. Nae-Young Choei & Hyungkyoo Kim & Seonghun Kim, 2020. "Improving Infrastructure Installation Planning Processes using Procedural Modeling," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-15, February.
    3. Volker, Jamey M B, 2020. "Exploring the Changing Faces of Housing Development and Demand in California: Millennials, Casitas, and Reducing VMT," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt6p94s5mc, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.

  8. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2006. "Impact fees and single-family home construction," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 284-306, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark Skidmore, 2014. "Housing Affordability: Lessons from the United States," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/11, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. Goodman, Christopher B, 2017. "The Fiscal Impacts of Urban Sprawl: Evidence from U.S. County Areas," SocArXiv wzcgj, Center for Open Science.
    3. Bimonte, Salvatore & Stabile, Arsenio, 2015. "Local taxation and urban development. Testing for the side-effects of the Italian property tax," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 100-107.
    4. Cameron K. Murray, 2016. "Developers pay developer charges," Discussion Papers Series 567, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    5. Gyourko, Joseph & Molloy, Raven, 2015. "Regulation and Housing Supply," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.),Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 1289-1337, Elsevier.
    6. Burge, Gregory, 2014. "The capitalization effects of school, residential, and commercial impact fees on undeveloped land values," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-13.
    7. Millar, Jonathan N. & Oliner, Stephen D. & Sichel, Daniel E., 2016. "Time-to-plan lags for commercial construction projects," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 75-89.
    8. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2009. "Development impact fees and employment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 54-62, January.
    9. Duffy, David & McQuinn, Kieran & Morley, Ciara & Foley, Daniel, 2015. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Winter 2015," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20154, October.
    10. Benjamin Dachis, 2018. "Hosing Homebuyers: Why Cities Should Not Pay for Water and Wastewater Infrastructure with Development Charges," e-briefs 281, C.D. Howe Institute.
    11. Lozano-Gracia, Nancy & Young, Cheryl & Lall, Somik V. & Vishwanath, Tara, 2013. "Leveraging land to enable urban transformation : lessons from global experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6312, The World Bank.
    12. Jenny Schuetz & Rachel Meltzer & Vicki Been, 2009. "Silver Bullet or Trojan Horse? The Effects of Inclusionary Zoning on Local Housing Markets," Working Paper 8519, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    13. Morley, Ciara & Duffy, David & McQuinn, Kieran, 2015. "A Review of Housing Supply Policies," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    14. Adam Jones, 2015. "Fees and Firms: An Empirical Examination of the Relationship Between Development Impact Fees and Firms," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(2), pages 261-269, June.
    15. Cheshire, Paul, 2009. "Urban land markets and policy failures," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30837, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    16. Ball, Michael & Meen, Geoffrey & Nygaard, Christian, 2010. "Housing supply price elasticities revisited: Evidence from international, national, local and company data," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 255-268, December.
    17. Jackson, Kristoffer, 2016. "Do land use regulations stifle residential development? Evidence from California cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 45-56.
    18. Youngmi Lee, 2010. "Impact Fees Decision Mechanism: Growth Management Decisions In Local Political Market," International Review of Public Administration, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 59-72, September.
    19. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 2007. "The effect of land use regulation on housing and land prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 420-435, May.
    20. Norman Gemmell & Arthur Grimes & Mark Skidmore, 2019. "Do Local Property Taxes Affect New Building Development? Results from a Quasi-Natural Experiment in New Zealand," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 310-333, February.

  9. Gregory Burge & Keith Ihlanfeldt, 2006. "The Effects Of Impact Fees On Multifamily Housing Construction," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 5-23, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark Skidmore, 2014. "Housing Affordability: Lessons from the United States," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/11, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2006. "Impact fees and single-family home construction," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 284-306, September.
    3. Bimonte, Salvatore & Stabile, Arsenio, 2015. "Local taxation and urban development. Testing for the side-effects of the Italian property tax," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 100-107.
    4. Ihlanfeldt, Keith & Yang, Cynthia Fan, 2019. "The Impact of Rental Housing on Neighborhood Racial and Social Integration," MPRA Paper 93485, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Gyourko, Joseph & Molloy, Raven, 2015. "Regulation and Housing Supply," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.),Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 1289-1337, Elsevier.
    6. Burge, Gregory, 2014. "The capitalization effects of school, residential, and commercial impact fees on undeveloped land values," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-13.
    7. Millar, Jonathan N. & Oliner, Stephen D. & Sichel, Daniel E., 2016. "Time-to-plan lags for commercial construction projects," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 75-89.
    8. Burge, Gregory & Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2009. "Development impact fees and employment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 54-62, January.
    9. Gallagher, Ryan M., 2016. "The fiscal externality of multifamily housing and its impact on the property tax: Evidence from cities and schools, 1980–2010," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 249-259.
    10. Ihlanfeldt, Keith & Mayock, Tom, 2018. "School segregation and the foreclosure crisis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 277-290.
    11. Ball, Michael & Meen, Geoffrey & Nygaard, Christian, 2010. "Housing supply price elasticities revisited: Evidence from international, national, local and company data," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 255-268, December.
    12. ., 2014. "Planning: reforms that might work and ones that won't," Chapters, in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 6, pages 127-154, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 2007. "The effect of land use regulation on housing and land prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 420-435, May.
    14. Ellen Hanak, 2008. "Is Water Policy Limiting Residential Growth? Evidence from California," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(1), pages 31-50.
    15. Ralph McLaughlin, 2012. "New housing supply elasticity in Australia: a comparison of dwelling types," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(2), pages 595-618, April.
    16. Ihlanfeldt, Keith, 2019. "The deconcentration of minority students attending bad schools: The role of housing affordability within school attendance zones containing good schools," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 83-101.
    17. Norman Gemmell & Arthur Grimes & Mark Skidmore, 2019. "Do Local Property Taxes Affect New Building Development? Results from a Quasi-Natural Experiment in New Zealand," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 310-333, February.

  10. Burge, Gregory S. & Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 2005. "Estimating Aggregate Levels of Property Tax Assessment Within Local Jurisdictions: An Extension of the Ihlanfeldt Model to Multiple Land Uses," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 58(4), pages 723-740, December.

    Cited by:

    1. William M. Doerner & Keith Ihlanfeldt, 2012. "An Empirical Analysis of the Property Tax Appeals Process," Working Papers wp2012_01_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University, revised Jul 2014.
    2. Glennon, Dennis & Kiefer, Hua & Mayock, Tom, 2018. "Measurement error in residential property valuation: An application of forecast combination," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-29.

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