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Planning: reforms that might work and ones that won't

In: Urban Economics and Urban Policy

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Abstract

In this bold, exciting and readable volume, Paul Cheshire, Max Nathan and Henry Overman illustrate the insights that recent economic research brings to our understanding of cities, and the lessons for urban policy-making. The authors present new evidence on the fundamental importance of cities to economic wellbeing and to the enrichment of our lives. They also argue that many policies have been trying to push water uphill and have done little to achieve their stated aims; or, worse, have had unintended and counterproductive consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • ., 2014. "Planning: reforms that might work and ones that won't," Chapters, in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 6, pages 127-154, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15105_6
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    1. Lawrence Hannah & Kyung-Hwan Kim & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "Land Use Controls and Housing Prices in Korea," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 30(1), pages 147-156, February.
    2. Barrie Needham & Erik Louw, 2006. "Institutional Economics and Policies for Changing Land Markets: The Case of Industrial Estates in the Netherlands," Journal of Property Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 75-90, March.
    3. Mayo, Stephen & Sheppard, Stephen, 2001. "Housing Supply and the Effects of Stochastic Development Control," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 109-128, June.
    4. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R. & Shaughnessy, Timothy M., 2004. "An empirical investigation of the effects of impact fees on housing and land markets," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 639-661, November.
    5. Paul Cheshire & Stephen Sheppard, 2005. "Introducing Price Signals into Land Use Planning Decision-making - a Proposal," ERSA conference papers ersa05p42, European Regional Science Association.
    6. G Bramley, 1998. "Measuring Planning: Indicators of Planning Restraint and its Impact on Housing Land Supply," Environment and Planning B, , vol. 25(1), pages 31-57, February.
    7. Cheshire, P. C. & Sheppard, Stephen Charles, 2005. "The introduction of price signals into land use planning decision-making : a proposal," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 568, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Paul Cheshire & Stephen Sheppard, 1989. "British Planning Policy and Access to Housing: Some Empirical Estimates," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 26(5), pages 469-485, October.
    9. Gregory Burge & Keith Ihlanfeldt, 2006. "The Effects Of Impact Fees On Multifamily Housing Construction," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 5-23, February.
    10. Barrie Needham, 1992. "A Theory of Land Prices when Land is Supplied Publicly: The Case of the Netherlands," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 29(5), pages 669-686, June.
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