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Do land use regulations stifle residential development? Evidence from California cities

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  • Jackson, Kristoffer

Abstract

This paper estimates the extent to which the supply of new housing is restricted by land use regulations using a panel of California cities from 1970–1995. While land use regulation is found to significantly reduce residential development, estimates from fixed effects regressions are about 50–75% smaller than those from pooled regressions. Using the two-way fixed effects model, the implementation of an additional regulation is found to reduce residential permits by an average of 4%, which comes through reductions in both multifamily and single-family permits. Of the regulations measured, those categorized as zoning and general controls have the strongest effects. The partial effects of individual regulations show that while some significantly reduce development, others have a large positive impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Jackson, Kristoffer, 2016. "Do land use regulations stifle residential development? Evidence from California cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 45-56.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:91:y:2016:i:c:p:45-56
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jue.2015.11.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:regeco:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:130-147 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Elliot Anenberg & Edward Kung, 2018. "Can More Housing Supply Solve the Affordability Crisis? Evidence from a Neighborhood Choice Model," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-035, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2016. "How Uncertain Are Economic Policies? Evidence from a survey on Japanese firms," Policy Discussion Papers 16008, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. Morikawa, Masayuki, 2016. "How uncertain are economic policies? New evidence from a firm survey," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 114-122.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Land use regulation; Zoning; Housing supply; Housing markets; California;

    JEL classification:

    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets
    • R52 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Land Use and Other Regulations
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

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