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The Effects of Growth Management on the Spatial Extent of Urban Development, Revisited

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  • Kurt Paulsen

Abstract

Does growth management result in lower marginal land consumption rates? The literature offers inconclusive and inconsistent results. This paper uses new data covering all U.S. metropolitan areas and multiple time periods to estimate panel models of effects of growth management on the spatial extent of urban development. Dummy variable estimation misleadingly suggests that growth management increases urban area extent. However, fixed-effect estimates across different growth management regimes find that more highly regulated regions and stronger planning states have lower marginal land consumption rates, while regional containment policies, as measured here, do not appear to reduce the size of urban areas.

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  • Kurt Paulsen, 2013. "The Effects of Growth Management on the Spatial Extent of Urban Development, Revisited," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 193-210.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:89:y:2013:ii:1:p:193-210
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    Cited by:

    1. Bigelow, Daniel & Borchers, Allison, 2017. "Major Uses of Land in the United States, 2012," Economic Information Bulletin 263079, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Bigelow, Daniel P. & Plantinga, Andrew J., 2017. "Town mouse and country mouse: Effects of urban growth controls on equilibrium sorting and land prices," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 104-115.
    3. Rouhani, Omid M. & Knittel, Christopher R. & Niemeier, Debbie, 2014. "Road Supply in Central London: Addition of an Ignored Social Cost," Journal of the Transportation Research Forum, Transportation Research Forum, vol. 53(1), pages 1-17.
    4. Yaxiong Ma & Sucharita Gopal, 2018. "Geographically Weighted Regression Models in Estimating Median Home Prices in Towns of Massachusetts Based on an Urban Sustainability Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-27, March.
    5. LEE, Sungwon & LEE, Bumsoo, 2020. "Comparing the impacts of local land use and urban spatial structure on household VMT and GHG emissions," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R52 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Land Use and Other Regulations

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