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Labor Markets and Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe : The Accession and Beyond

Author

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  • Nicholas Barr

Abstract

This book summarizes social policy reform during the transition and European Union accession and analyses the social policy challenges which continue to face both old and new member states. Specifically, the book amplifies two sets of arguments. First, social policy under communism was in important respects well-suited to the old order and - precisely for that reason - was systematically badly-suited to a market economy. Strategic reform directions thus followed from the nature of the transition process and from constraints imposed by EU accession. Secondly, successful accession is not the end of the story: economic and social trends over the past 50 years are creating strains for social policy which all countries - old and new members - will have to face.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Barr, 2005. "Labor Markets and Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe : The Accession and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7425, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7425
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/7425/343830PAPER0EU101OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Wössmann, 2006. "Does Educational Tracking Affect Performance and Inequality? Differences- in-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 63-76, March.
    2. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    3. Barr, Nicholas, 2004. "Economics of the Welfare State," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 4, number 9780199264971.
    4. Jan Rutkowski, 1996. "High skills pay off: the changing wage structure during economic transition in Poland," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(1), pages 89-112, May.
    5. UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre. MONEE project, 2001. "A Decade of Transition," Papers remore01/15, Regional Monitoring Report.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dena Ringold & Leszek Kasek, 2007. "Social Assistance in the New EU Member States : Strengthening Performance and Labor Market Incentives," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6744, April.
    2. Estrin, Saul & Mickiewicz, Tomasz, 2010. "Entrepreneurship in Transition Economies: The Role of Institutions and Generational Change," IZA Discussion Papers 4805, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Easterlin, Richard A., 2009. "Lost in transition: Life satisfaction on the road to capitalism," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 130-145, August.
    4. Cristina Matos, 2013. "The Shifting Welfare State in Hungary and Latvia," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(4), pages 851-891, October.

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