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Did UberX reduce ambulance volume?

Author

Listed:
  • Leon Moskatel
  • David Slusky

Abstract

Ambulances are a vital part of emergency medical services. However, they come in single, high intervention form, which is at times unnecessary, resulting in excessive costs for patients and insurers. In this paper, we ask whether UberX's entry into a city caused substitution away from traditional ambulances for low‐risk patients, reducing overall volume. Using a city‐panel over‐time and leverage that UberX enter markets sporadically over multiple years, we find that UberX entry reduced the per capita ambulance volume by at least 6.7%. Our result is robust to numerous specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Leon Moskatel & David Slusky, 2019. "Did UberX reduce ambulance volume?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(7), pages 817-829, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:28:y:2019:i:7:p:817-829
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.3888
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Courtemanche, Charles & Friedson, Andrew I. & Koller, Andrew P. & Rees, Daniel I., 2017. "The Affordable Care Act and Ambulance Response Times," IZA Discussion Papers 10951, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Joseph J. Doyle Jr. & John A. Graves & Jonathan Gruber & Samuel A. Kleiner, 2015. "Measuring Returns to Hospital Care: Evidence from Ambulance Referral Patterns," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(1), pages 170-214.
    3. M. Keith Chen & Judith A. Chevalier & Peter E. Rossi & Emily Oehlsen, 2017. "The Value of Flexible Work: Evidence from Uber Drivers," NBER Working Papers 23296, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Peter Cohen & Robert Hahn & Jonathan Hall & Steven Levitt & Robert Metcalfe, 2016. "Using Big Data to Estimate Consumer Surplus: The Case of Uber," NBER Working Papers 22627, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 12th August 2019
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2019-08-12 11:00:31

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    Cited by:

    1. Courtemanche, Charles & Friedson, Andrew I. & Rees, Daniel I., 2018. "Ambulance Utilization in New York City after the Implementation of the Affordable Care Act," IZA Discussion Papers 11444, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • L91 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Transportation: General

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