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Social Policy as a Productive Force

Listed author(s):
  • Julia Bock-Schappelwein

    (WIFO)

  • Rainer Eppel
  • Ulrike Mühlberger

    (WIFO)

Registered author(s):

    International examples clearly demonstrate that a high level of social policy does not necessarily correlate with slow growth rates. Empirical literature shows that incentives of social policy measures that lead to a growth-enhancing education, research and development policy are of utmost importance. High quality education is not only an important predictor of individual income, but also of productivity and growth.

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    Article provided by WIFO in its journal WIFO-Monatsberichte.

    Volume (Year): 82 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 11 (November)
    Pages: 845-857

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    Handle: RePEc:wfo:monber:y:2009:i:11:p:845-857
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