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Prohibition and the Supply of Brazilian Mahogany

  • Ariaster B. Chimeli
  • Roy G. Boyd
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    We use a unique data set to investigate the economic consequences of banning the harvest and trade of Brazilian mahogany. Because we find strong evidence that mahogany is smuggled out of Brazil as "other tropical species" through formal export mechanisms, we are able to construct a time series of quantities and implicit export prices covering both the periods before and after prohibition. Our finding suggests that a trade ban increases supply and makes the illegal good more affordable. Our analysis can offer important insights into other illegal markets, such as those for narcotics and products manufactured from endangered animal species.

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    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

    Volume (Year): 86 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 191-208

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:86:y:2010:i:1:p:191-208
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    1. Poret, Sylvaine, 2002. "Paradoxical effects of law enforcement policies: the case of the illicit drug market," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 465-493, December.
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    4. Kleiber, Christian & Zeileis, Achim, 2004. "Validating multiple structural change models : A case study," Technical Reports 2004,34, Technische Universität Dortmund, Sonderforschungsbereich 475: Komplexitätsreduktion in multivariaten Datenstrukturen.
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    6. Edward B. Barbier & Nancy Bockstael & Joanne C. Burgess & Ivar Strand, 1995. "The Linkages between the Timber Trade and Tropical Deforestation—Indonesia," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 411-442, 05.
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