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Private Profits and Public Health: Does Advertising of Smoking Cessation Products Encourage Smokers to Quit?

Author

Listed:
  • Rosemary Avery
  • Donald Kenkel
  • Dean R. Lillard
  • Alan Mathios

Abstract

We study the impact of smoking cessation product advertising. To measure potential exposure, we link survey data on magazine-reading habits and smoking behavior with an archive of print advertisements. We find that smokers who are exposed to more advertising are more likely to attempt to quit and to successfully quit. While some increased quitting involves product purchases, we find that product advertisements also prompt cold turkey quitting. Identifying the causal impact of advertising is difficult because advertisers target consumers. Although reverse causality could bias our estimates upward, our baseline results are not sensitive to a series of checks.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosemary Avery & Donald Kenkel & Dean R. Lillard & Alan Mathios, 2007. "Private Profits and Public Health: Does Advertising of Smoking Cessation Products Encourage Smokers to Quit?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 447-481.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:115:y:2007:p:447-481
    DOI: 10.1086/520065
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lillard, Dean R. & Plassmann, Vandana & Kenkel, Donald & Mathios, Alan, 2007. "Who kicks the habit and how they do it: Socioeconomic differences across methods of quitting smoking in the USA," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(12), pages 2504-2519, June.
    2. Toshiaki Iizuka & Ginger Zhe Jin, 2005. "Drug Advertising and Health Habit," NBER Working Papers 11770, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Pauline M. Ippolito & Alan D. Mathios, 1990. "Information, Advertising and Health Choices: A Study of the Cereal Market," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 21(3), pages 459-480, Autumn.
    4. Jones, Andrew M., 1999. "Adjustment costs, withdrawal effects, and cigarette addiction," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 125-137, January.
    5. Michael P. Murray, 2006. "Avoiding Invalid Instruments and Coping with Weak Instruments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 111-132, Fall.
    6. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2000:90:3:401-403_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Davina C. Ling & Ernst R. Berndt & Margaret K. Kyle, 2002. "Deregulating Direct-to-Consumer Marketing of Prescription Drugs: Effects on Prescription and Over-the-Counter Product Sales," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(S2), pages 691-723.
    8. Rosemary Avery & Donald Kenkel & Dean Lillard & Alan Mathios, 2007. "Regulating advertisements: the case of smoking cessation products," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 185-208, April.
    9. W. David Bradford & Andrew N. Kleit, 2006. "Direct to Consumer Advertising," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, chapter 29 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vincenzo Galasso & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato & Francesco Billari, 2017. "Information and Women’s Intentions: Experimental Evidence About Child Care," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 109-128, February.
    2. Ciro Avitabile, 2012. "Does Information Improve the Health Behavior of Adults Targeted by a Conditional Transfer Program?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(3), pages 785-825.
    3. Daysal, N. Meltem & Orsini, Chiara, 2012. "Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Health Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 6409, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Leonardo Bursztyn & Davide Cantoni, 2016. "Tear in the Iron Curtain: The Impact of Western Television on Consumption Behavior," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(1), pages 25-41, March.
    5. Molitor, Ramona, 2017. "Publicly announced speed limit enforcement and its impact on road safety: Evidence from the German Blitzmarathons," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-75-17, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
    6. Ann L. Owen & Julio Videras & Stephen Wu, 2012. "More Information Is Not Always Better: The Case Of Voluntary Provision Of Environmental Quality," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(3), pages 585-603, July.
    7. Deliana Kostova & Evan Blecher, 2013. "Does Advertising Matter? Estimating The Impact Of Cigarette Advertising On Smoking Among Youth In Developing Countries," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(3), pages 537-548, July.
    8. Dave, Dhaval & Saffer, Henry, 2013. "Demand for smokeless tobacco: Role of advertising," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 682-697.
    9. Itzik Fadlon & Torben Heien Nielsen, 2017. "Family Health Behaviors," EPRU Working Paper Series 17-05, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    10. Joachim Marti, 2012. "Assessing preferences for improved smoking cessation medications: a discrete choice experiment," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(5), pages 533-548, October.
    11. Dhaval M. Dave & Daniel Dench & Michael Grossman & Donald S. Kenkel & Henry Saffer, 2018. "Does E-Cigarette Advertising Encourage Adult Smokers to Quit?," NBER Working Papers 24277, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Strain, Michael R., 2013. "Single-sex classes & student outcomes: Evidence from North Carolina," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 73-87.
    13. Ahmed Khwaja & Frank Sloan & Yang Wang, 2009. "Do Smokers Value Their Health and Longevity Less?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 171-196, February.
    14. Avery, Rosemary J. & Eisenberg, Matthew D. & Simon, Kosali I., 2012. "The impact of direct-to-consumer television and magazine advertising on antidepressant use," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 705-718.
    15. Price, Joseph & Simon, Kosali, 2009. "Patient education and the impact of new medical research," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1166-1174, December.

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