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Sexual Orientation, Prejudice, and Segregation

Author

Listed:
  • Erik Plug
  • Dinand Webbink
  • Nick Martin

Abstract

This article examines whether gay and lesbian workers sort into tolerant occupations. With information on sexual orientation, prejudice, and occupational choice taken from Australian Twin Registers, we find that gays and lesbians shy away from prejudiced occupations. We show that our segregation results are largely driven by those gay and lesbian workers with disclosed identities and are robust to the inclusion of unobserved factors that are inherited and observed factors that strongly correlate with productive skills and vocational preferences. Our segregation estimates are consistent with prejudice-based theories of employer and employee discrimination against gay and lesbian workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Plug & Dinand Webbink & Nick Martin, 2014. "Sexual Orientation, Prejudice, and Segregation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(1), pages 123-159.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/673315
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Geijtenbeek, Lydia & Plug, Erik, 2015. "Is There a Penalty for Becoming a Woman? Is There a Premium for Becoming a Man? Evidence from a Sample of Transsexual Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 9077, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Diaz-Serrano, Luis & Meix-Llop, Enric, 2015. "Do Schools Discriminate Against Homosexual Parents? Evidence from an Internet Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 9044, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Bryson, Alex & Chevalier, Arnaud, 2015. "Is there a taste for racial discrimination amongst employers?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 51-63.
    4. Karen Leppel, 2016. "The incidence of self-employment by sexual orientation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 347-363, March.
    5. Uhrig, S.C. Noah, 2014. "An examination of poverty and sexual orientation in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Petri Böckerman & Alex Bryson & Antti Kauhanen & Mari Kangasniemi, 2016. "Does Job Support Make Workers Happy?," DoQSS Working Papers 16-16, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    7. Francisco Perales, 2016. "The Costs of Being “Different”: Sexual Identity and Subjective Wellbeing over the Life Course," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 827-849, June.
    8. Buser, Thomas & Geijtenbeek, Lydia & Plug, Erik, 2015. "Do Gays Shy Away from Competition? Do Lesbians Compete Too Much?," IZA Discussion Papers 9382, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Alan Manning & Paolo Masella, 2018. "Diffusion of Social Values Through the Lens of US Newspapers," CEP Discussion Papers dp1559, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    10. repec:eee:jeborg:v:151:y:2018:i:c:p:191-198 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Chen, Shuai & van Ours, Jan C., 2017. "Subjective Well-Being and Partnership Dynamics: Are Same-Sex Relationships Different?," IZA Discussion Papers 11043, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. repec:bla:coecpo:v:36:y:2018:i:1:p:136-148 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:spr:jlabre:v:39:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9249-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Shuai Chen & Jan (J.C.) van Ours, 2017. "Subjective Well-being and Partnership Dynamics; Are Same-Sex Relationships Different?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-088/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    15. Stephan Humpert, 2012. "Somewhere over the Rainbow: Sexual Orientation Discrimination in Germany," Working Paper Series in Economics 245, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    16. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2016. "Occupational segregation by sexual orientation in the U.S.: Exploring its economic effects on same-sex couples," Working Papers 425, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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