IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/ecdecc/y2006v54i3p605-33.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

NAFTA and the Environment: What Can the Data Tell Us?

Author

Listed:
  • Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti

Abstract

Critics of trade liberalization agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have expressed concerns that polluting industries will locate in developing countries to evade more stringent regulation, with adverse environmental consequences. A study of NAFTA's effects on U.S.-Mexico trade finds that despite differences in the stringency of U.S. and Mexican environmental policies, NAFTA did not cause Mexico to specialize in dirtier industries between 1989 and 1999. Regarding the location of manufacturing production during the NAFTA transition, although growth was fastest in the congested Mexican border region, growth declined in the congested central region and increased in the less congested interior region, with all regions shifting toward less polluting industries. Most of the observed measures of air quality in the border region, which can serve as an indicator of NAFTA's short-term scale effects, do not exhibit significant breaks in their trend of improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti, 2006. "NAFTA and the Environment: What Can the Data Tell Us?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(3), pages 605-633, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2006:v:54:i:3:p:605-33
    DOI: 10.1086/500029
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/500029
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Daniel C. Esty & Diana Orejas, 2000. "NAFTA and the Environment: Seven Years Later," Peterson Institute Press: Policy Analyses in International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa61, October.
    2. Kahn, Matthew E., 2003. "The geography of US pollution intensive trade: evidence from 1958 to 1994," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 383-400, July.
    3. Eskeland, Gunnar S. & Harrison, Ann E., 2003. "Moving to greener pastures? Multinationals and the pollution haven hypothesis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 1-23, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arik Levinson, 2009. "Technology, International Trade, and Pollution from US Manufacturing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(5), pages 2177-2192, December.
    2. Arik Levinson, 2010. "Comment on "Trade Growth, Production Fragmentation, and China's Environment"," NBER Chapters, in: China's Growing Role in World Trade, pages 469-472, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Simon Condliffe & O. Ashton Morgan, 2009. "The effects of air quality regulations on the location decisions of pollution-intensive manufacturing plants," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 83-93, August.
    4. Arik Levinson, 2010. "Pollution and international trade in services," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 93-105, June.
    5. Qirjo, Dhimitri & Pascalau, Razvan & Krichevskiy, Dmitriy, 2019. "CETA and Air Pollution," MPRA Paper 95608, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Cherniwchan, Jevan, 2017. "Trade liberalization and the environment: Evidence from NAFTA and U.S. manufacturing," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 130-149.
    7. Lipford Jody W. & Yandle Bruce, 2011. "NAFTA, Environmental Kuznets Curves, and Mexico's Progress," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 10(4), pages 1-20, January.
    8. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0035-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2006:v:54:i:3:p:605-33. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.