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Stakeholder Pressures as Determinants of CSR Strategic Choice: Why do Firms Choose Symbolic Versus Substantive Self-Regulatory Codes of Conduct?

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Listed:
  • Luis Perez-Batres

    ()

  • Jonathan Doh

    ()

  • Van Miller

    ()

  • Michael Pisani

    ()

Abstract

To encourage corporations to contribute positively to the environment in which they operate, voluntary self-regulatory codes (SRC) have been enacted and refined over the past 15 years. Two of the most prominent are the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative. In this paper, we explore the impact of different stakeholders’ pressures on the selection of strategic choices to join SRCs. Our results show that corporations react differently to different sets of stakeholder pressures and that the SRC selection depends on the type and intensiveness of the stakeholder pressures as well as the resources at hand to respond to those pressures. Our contribution offers a more specific and finely variegated analysis of firm-stakeholder interactions. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Luis Perez-Batres & Jonathan Doh & Van Miller & Michael Pisani, 2012. "Stakeholder Pressures as Determinants of CSR Strategic Choice: Why do Firms Choose Symbolic Versus Substantive Self-Regulatory Codes of Conduct?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 157-172, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:110:y:2012:i:2:p:157-172
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-012-1419-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Diana Corina Gligor-Cimpoieru, 2015. "Evaluating the HR Dimension of CSR in a Strategic Approach," Theory Methodology Practice (TMP), Faculty of Economics, University of Miskolc, vol. 11(02), pages 3-12.
    2. repec:eee:proeco:v:199:y:2018:i:c:p:138-149 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2045-:d:118044 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. ahmadu, aminu & Md. Harashid, Haron & Azlan, Amran, 2018. "Critical Factors Towards Philanthropic Dimension Of CSR in The Nigerian Financial Sector: The Mediating Effects Of Cultural Influence," MPRA Paper 85557, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Andreas Hoepner & Arleta Majoch, 2016. "Pension Funds and the Principles for Responsible Investment: Multiplying Stakeholder Salience?," ICMA Centre Discussion Papers in Finance icma-dp2016-07, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    6. repec:kap:jbuset:v:148:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10551-016-3019-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Eun-Ju Lee & Gusang Kwon & Hyun Shin & Seungeun Yang & Sukhan Lee & Minah Suh, 2014. "The Spell of Green: Can Frontal EEG Activations Identify Green Consumers?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 511-521, July.
    8. Laurence Vigneau & Michael Humphreys & Jeremy Moon, 2015. "How Do Firms Comply with International Sustainability Standards? Processes and Consequences of Adopting the Global Reporting Initiative," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 131(2), pages 469-486, October.
    9. Sefa Hayibor & Colleen Collins, 2016. "Motivators of Mobilization," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 139(2), pages 351-374, December.
    10. repec:eee:iburev:v:26:y:2017:i:6:p:1075-1087 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Maria Steinmeier, 2016. "Fraud in Sustainability Departments? An Exploratory Study," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 138(3), pages 477-492, October.
    12. Norifumi Kawai & Roger Strange & Antonella Zucchella, 2016. "Stakeholder Pressures, EMS Implementation, and Green Innovation in MNC Overseas Subsidiaries," DEM Working Papers Series 121, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    13. Virginia Bodolica & Martin Spraggon, 2015. "An Examination into the Disclosure, Structure, and Contents of Ethical Codes in Publicly Listed Acquiring Firms," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 459-472, February.
    14. Deborah de Lange & Timo Busch & Javier Delgado-Ceballos, 2012. "Sustaining Sustainability in Organizations," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 151-156, October.
    15. Petr Petera & Jaroslav Wagner, 2015. "Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and its Reflections in the Literature," European Financial and Accounting Journal, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2015(2), pages 13-32.
    16. Cairns, George & Goodwin, Paul & Wright, George, 2016. "A decision-analysis-based framework for analysing stakeholder behaviour in scenario planning," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 249(3), pages 1050-1062.
    17. repec:kap:jbuset:v:143:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10551-016-3074-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Omid Sabbaghi & Gerald Cavanagh, 2015. "Jesuit, Catholic, and Green: Evidence from Loyola University Chicago," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 317-326, March.
    19. Christopher Wickert & Andreas Georg Scherer & Laura J. Spence, 2016. "Walking and Talking Corporate Social Responsibility: Implications of Firm Size and Organizational Cost," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(7), pages 1169-1196, November.
    20. repec:eee:soceco:v:73:y:2018:i:c:p:116-124 is not listed on IDEAS

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